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Results found: 13208

Dictionary : The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44

A

Result Translation
a
Gastropoda \Gas*trop"o*da\, n. pl., [NL., fr. Gr. ?, ?, stomach + -poda.] (Zo["o]l.) One of the classes of Mollusca, of great extent. It includes most of the marine spiral shells, and the land and fresh-water snails. They generally creep by means of a flat, muscular disk, or foot, on the ventral side of the body. The head usually bears one or two pairs of tentacles. See {Mollusca}. [Written also {Gasteropoda}.] [1913 Webster] Note: The Gastropoda are divided into three subclasses; viz.: ({a}) The Streptoneura or Dioecia, including the Pectinibranchiata, Rhipidoglossa, Docoglossa, and Heteropoda. ({b}) The Euthyneura, including the Pulmonata and Opisthobranchia. ({c}) The Amphineura, including the Polyplacophora and Aplacophora. [1913 Webster]
a
Gripe \Gripe\, n. 1. Grasp; seizure; fast hold; clutch. [1913 Webster] A barren scepter in my gripe. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. That on which the grasp is put; a handle; a grip; as, the gripe of a sword. [1913 Webster] 3. (Mech.) A device for grasping or holding anything; a brake to stop a wheel. [1913 Webster] 4. Oppression; cruel exaction; affiction; pinching distress; as, the gripe of poverty. [1913 Webster] 5. Pinching and spasmodic pain in the intestines; -- chiefly used in the plural. [1913 Webster] 6. (Naut.) (a) The piece of timber which terminates the keel at the fore end; the forefoot. (b) The compass or sharpness of a ship's stern under the water, having a tendency to make her keep a good wind. (c) pl. An assemblage of ropes, dead-eyes, and hocks, fastened to ringbolts in the deck, to secure the boats when hoisted; also, broad bands passed around a boat to secure it at the davits and prevent swinging. [1913 Webster] {Gripe penny}, {a} miser; a niggard. --D. L. Mackenzie. [1913 Webster]
a
Infinitive \In*fin"i*tive\, n. [L. infinitivus: cf. F. infinitif. See {Infinite}.] Unlimited; not bounded or restricted; undefined. [1913 Webster] {Infinitive mood} (Gram.), that form of the verb which merely names the action, and performs the office of a verbal noun. Some grammarians make two forms in English: ({a}) The simple form, as, speak, go, hear, before which to is commonly placed, as, to speak; to go; to hear. ({b}) The form of the imperfect participle, called the infinitive in -ing; as, going is as easy as standing. [1913 Webster] Note: With the auxiliary verbs may, can, must, might, could, would, and should, the simple infinitive is expressed without to; as, you may speak; they must hear, etc. The infinitive usually omits to with the verbs let, dare, do, bid, make, see, hear, need, etc.; as, let me go; you dare not tell; make him work; hear him talk, etc. [1913 Webster] Note: In Anglo-Saxon, the simple infinitive was not preceded by to (the sign of modern simple infinitive), but it had a dative form (sometimes called the gerundial infinitive) which was preceded by to, and was chiefly employed in expressing purpose. See {Gerund}, 2. [1913 Webster] Note: The gerundial ending (-anne) not only took the same form as the simple infinitive (-an), but it was confounded with the present participle in -ende, or -inde (later -inge). [1913 Webster]
a
Legate \Leg"ate\ (l[e^]g"[asl]t), n. [OE. legat, L. legatus, fr. legare to send with a commission or charge, to depute, fr. lex, legis, law: cf. F. l['e]gat, It. legato. See {Legal}.] 1. An ambassador or envoy. [1913 Webster] 2. An ecclesiastic representing the pope and invested with the authority of the Holy See. [1913 Webster] Note: Legates are of three kinds: ({a}) Legates a latere, now always cardinals. They are called ordinary or extraordinary legates, the former governing provinces, and the latter class being sent to foreign countries on extraordinary occasions. ({b}) Legati missi, who correspond to the ambassadors of temporal governments. ({c}) Legati nati, or legates by virtue of their office, as the archbishops of Salzburg and Prague. [1913 Webster] 3. (Rom. Hist.) (a) An official assistant given to a general or to the governor of a province. (b) Under the emperors, a governor sent to a province. [1913 Webster]
a
Libration \Li*bra"tion\ (l[-i]*br[=a]"sh[u^]n), n. [L. libratio: cf. F. libration.] 1. The act or state of librating. --Jer. Taylor. [1913 Webster] 2. (Astron.) A real or apparent libratory motion, like that of a balance before coming to rest. [1913 Webster] {Libration of the moon}, any one of those small periodical changes in the position of the moon's surface relatively to the earth, in consequence of which narrow portions at opposite limbs become visible or invisible alternately. It receives different names according to the manner in which it takes place; as: {(a)} Libration in longitude, that which, depending on the place of the moon in its elliptic orbit, causes small portions near the eastern and western borders alternately to appear and disappear each month. ({b}) Libration in latitude, that which depends on the varying position of the moon's axis in respect to the spectator, causing the alternate appearance and disappearance of either pole. ({c}) Diurnal or parallactic libration, that which brings into view on the upper limb, at rising and setting, some parts not in the average visible hemisphere. [1913 Webster]
a
Respiration \Res`pi*ra"tion\ (r?s`p?*r?"sh?n), n. [L. respiratio: cf. F. respiration. See {Respire}.] 1. The act of respiring or breathing again, or catching one's breath. [1913 Webster] 2. Relief from toil or suffering: rest. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Till the day Appear of respiration to the just And vengeance to the wicked. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 3. Interval; intermission. [Obs.] --Bp. Hall. [1913 Webster] 4. (Physiol.) The act of resping or breathing; the act of taking in and giving out air; the aggregate of those processes bu which oxygen is introduced into the system, and carbon dioxide, or carbonic acid, removed. [1913 Webster] Note: Respiration in the higher animals is divided into: ({a}) Internal respiration, or the interchange of oxygen and carbonic acid between the cells of the body and the bathing them, which in one sense is a process of nutrition. ({b}) External respiration, or the gaseous interchange taking place in the special respiratory organs, the lungs. This constitutes respiration proper. --Gamgee. [1913 Webster] In the respiration of plants oxygen is likewise absorbed and carbonic acid exhaled, but in the light this process is obscured by another process which goes on with more vigor, in which the plant inhales and absorbs carbonic acid and exhales free oxygen. [1913 Webster]
a
Monkey \Mon"key\, n.; pl. {Monkeys}. [Cf. OIt. monicchio, It. monnino, dim. of monna an ape, also dame, mistress, contr. fr. madonna. See {Madonna}.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) (a) In the most general sense, any one of the Quadrumana, including apes, baboons, and lemurs. (b) Any species of Quadrumana, except the lemurs. (c) Any one of numerous species of Quadrumana (esp. such as have a long tail and prehensile feet) exclusive of apes and baboons. [1913 Webster] Note: The monkeys are often divided into three groups: ({a}) {Catarrhines}, or {Simid[ae]}. These have an oblong head, with the oblique flat nostrils near together. Some have no tail, as the apes. All these are natives of the Old World. ({b}) {Platyrhines}, or {Cebid[ae]}. These have a round head, with a broad nasal septum, so that the nostrils are wide apart and directed downward. The tail is often prehensile, and the thumb is short and not opposable. These are natives of the New World. ({c}) {Strepsorhines}, or {Lemuroidea}. These have a pointed head with curved nostrils. They are natives of Southern Asia, Africa, and Madagascar. [1913 Webster] 2. A term of disapproval, ridicule, or contempt, as for a mischievous child. [1913 Webster] This is the monkey's own giving out; she is persuaded I will marry her. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 3. The weight or hammer of a pile driver, that is, a very heavy mass of iron, which, being raised on high, falls on the head of the pile, and drives it into the earth; the falling weight of a drop hammer used in forging. [1913 Webster] 4. A small trading vessel of the sixteenth century. [1913 Webster] {Monkey boat}. (Naut.) (a) A small boat used in docks. (b) A half-decked boat used on the River Thames. {Monkey block} (Naut.), a small single block strapped with a swivel. --R. H. Dana, Jr. {Monkey flower} (Bot.), a plant of the genus {Mimulus}; -- so called from the appearance of its gaping corolla. --Gray. {Monkey gaff} (Naut.), a light gaff attached to the topmast for the better display of signals at sea. {Monkey jacket}, a short closely fitting jacket, worn by sailors. {Monkey rail} (Naut.), a second and lighter rail raised about six inches above the quarter rail of a ship. {Monkey shine}, monkey trick. [Slang, U.S.] {Monkey trick}, a mischievous prank. --Saintsbury. {Monkey wheel}. See {Gin block}, under 5th {Gin}. [1913 Webster]
a
Motion \Mo"tion\, n. [F., fr. L. motio, fr. movere, motum, to move. See {Move}.] 1. The act, process, or state of changing place or position; movement; the passing of a body from one place or position to another, whether voluntary or involuntary; -- opposed to {rest}. [1913 Webster] Speaking or mute, all comeliness and grace attends thee, and each word, each motion, forms. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. Power of, or capacity for, motion. [1913 Webster] Devoid of sense and motion. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 3. Direction of movement; course; tendency; as, the motion of the planets is from west to east. [1913 Webster] In our proper motion we ascend. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 4. Change in the relative position of the parts of anything; action of a machine with respect to the relative movement of its parts. [1913 Webster] This is the great wheel to which the clock owes its motion. --Dr. H. More. [1913 Webster] 5. Movement of the mind, desires, or passions; mental act, or impulse to any action; internal activity. [1913 Webster] Let a good man obey every good motion rising in his heart, knowing that every such motion proceeds from God. --South. [1913 Webster] 6. A proposal or suggestion looking to action or progress; esp., a formal proposal made in a deliberative assembly; as, a motion to adjourn. [1913 Webster] Yes, I agree, and thank you for your motion. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 7. (Law) An application made to a court or judge orally in open court. Its object is to obtain an order or rule directing some act to be done in favor of the applicant. --Mozley & W. [1913 Webster] 8. (Mus.) Change of pitch in successive sounds, whether in the same part or in groups of parts. [1913 Webster] The independent motions of different parts sounding together constitute counterpoint. --Grove. [1913 Webster] Note: Conjunct motion is that by single degrees of the scale. Contrary motion is that when parts move in opposite directions. Disjunct motion is motion by skips. Oblique motion is that when one part is stationary while another moves. Similar or direct motion is that when parts move in the same direction. [1913 Webster] 9. A puppet show or puppet. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] What motion's this? the model of Nineveh? --Beau. & Fl. [1913 Webster] Note: Motion, in mechanics, may be simple or compound. {Simple motions} are: ({a}) straight translation, which, if of indefinite duration, must be reciprocating. ({b}) Simple rotation, which may be either continuous or reciprocating, and when reciprocating is called oscillating. ({c}) Helical, which, if of indefinite duration, must be reciprocating. {Compound motion} consists of combinations of any of the simple motions. [1913 Webster] {Center of motion}, {Harmonic motion}, etc. See under {Center}, {Harmonic}, etc. {Motion block} (Steam Engine), a crosshead. {Perpetual motion} (Mech.), an incessant motion conceived to be attainable by a machine supplying its own motive forces independently of any action from without. According to the law of conservation of energy, such perpetual motion is impossible, and no device has yet been built that is capable of perpetual motion. [1913 Webster +PJC] Syn: See {Movement}. [1913 Webster]
A
A \A\ (named [=a] in the English, and most commonly ["a] in other languages). The first letter of the English and of many other alphabets. The capital A of the alphabets of Middle and Western Europe, as also the small letter (a), besides the forms in Italic, black letter, etc., are all descended from the old Latin A, which was borrowed from the Greek {Alpha}, of the same form; and this was made from the first letter (?) of the Ph[oe]nician alphabet, the equivalent of the Hebrew Aleph, and itself from the Egyptian origin. The Aleph was a consonant letter, with a guttural breath sound that was not an element of Greek articulation; and the Greeks took it to represent their vowel Alpha with the ["a] sound, the Ph[oe]nician alphabet having no vowel symbols. [1913 Webster] This letter, in English, is used for several different vowel sounds. See Guide to pronunciation, [sect][sect] 43-74. The regular long a, as in fate, etc., is a comparatively modern sound, and has taken the place of what, till about the early part of the 17th century, was a sound of the quality of ["a] (as in far). [1913 Webster] 2. (Mus.) The name of the sixth tone in the model major scale (that in C), or the first tone of the minor scale, which is named after it the scale in A minor. The second string of the violin is tuned to the A in the treble staff. -- A sharp (A[sharp]) is the name of a musical tone intermediate between A and B. -- A flat (A[flat]) is the name of a tone intermediate between A and G. [1913 Webster] {A per se} (L. per se by itself), one pre["e]minent; a nonesuch. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] O fair Creseide, the flower and A per se Of Troy and Greece. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]
A
A \A\ [From AS. of off, from. See {Of}.] Of. [Obs.] ``The name of John a Gaunt.'' ``What time a day is it ?'' --Shak. ``It's six a clock.'' --B. Jonson. [1913 Webster]
A
A \A\ A barbarous corruption of have, of he, and sometimes of it and of they. ``So would I a done'' ``A brushes his hat.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]
A
A \A\ ([.a]), prep. [Abbreviated form of an (AS. on). See {On}.] 1. In; on; at; by. [Obs.] ``A God's name.'' ``Torn a pieces.'' ``Stand a tiptoe.'' ``A Sundays'' --Shak. ``Wit that men have now a days.'' --Chaucer. ``Set them a work.'' --Robynson (More's Utopia). [1913 Webster] 2. In process of; in the act of; into; to; -- used with verbal substantives in -ing which begin with a consonant. This is a shortened form of the preposition an (which was used before the vowel sound); as in a hunting, a building, a begging. ``Jacob, when he was a dying'' --Heb. xi. 21. ``We'll a birding together.'' `` It was a doing.'' --Shak. ``He burst out a laughing.'' --Macaulay. Note: The hyphen may be used to connect a with the verbal substantive (as, a-hunting, a-building) or the words may be written separately. This form of expression is now for the most part obsolete, the a being omitted and the verbal substantive treated as a participle. [1913 Webster]
A
A \A\ ([.a] emph. [=a]). 1. [Shortened form of an. AS. [=a]n one. See {One}.] An adjective, commonly called the indefinite article, and signifying one or any, but less emphatically. ``At a birth''; ``In a word''; ``At a blow''. --Shak. Note: It is placed before nouns of the singular number denoting an individual object, or a quality individualized, before collective nouns, and also before plural nouns when the adjective few or the phrase great many or good many is interposed; as, a dog, a house, a man; a color; a sweetness; a hundred, a fleet, a regiment; a few persons, a great many days. It is used for an, for the sake of euphony, before words beginning with a consonant sound [for exception of certain words beginning with h, see {An}]; as, a table, a woman, a year, a unit, a eulogy, a ewe, a oneness, such a one, etc. Formally an was used both before vowels and consonants. [1913 Webster] 2. [Originally the preposition a (an, on).] In each; to or for each; as, ``twenty leagues a day'', ``a hundred pounds a year'', ``a dollar a yard'', etc. [1913 Webster]
A
A \A\ An expletive, void of sense, to fill up the meter [1913 Webster] A merry heart goes all the day, Your sad tires in a mile-a. --Shak. [1913 Webster]
A-
A- \A-\ A, as a prefix to English words, is derived from various sources. (1) It frequently signifies on or in (from an, a forms of AS. on), denoting a state, as in afoot, on foot, abed, amiss, asleep, aground, aloft, away (AS. onweg), and analogically, ablaze, atremble, etc. (2) AS. of off, from, as in adown (AS. ofd[=u]ne off the dun or hill). (3) AS. [=a]- (Goth. us-, ur-, Ger. er-), usually giving an intensive force, and sometimes the sense of away, on, back, as in arise, abide, ago. (4) Old English y- or i- (corrupted from the AS. inseparable particle ge-, cognate with OHG. ga-, gi-, Goth. ga-), which, as a prefix, made no essential addition to the meaning, as in aware. (5) French [`a] (L. ad to), as in abase, achieve. (6) L. a, ab, abs, from, as in avert. (7) Greek insep. prefix [alpha] without, or privative, not, as in abyss, atheist; akin to E. un-. [1913 Webster] Note: Besides these, there are other sources from which the prefix a takes its origin. [1913 Webster]
a
Ferment \Fer"ment\, n. [L. fermentum ferment (in senses 1 & 2), perh. for fervimentum, fr. fervere to be boiling hot, boil, ferment: cf. F. ferment. Cf. 1st {Barm}, {Fervent}.] 1. That which causes fermentation, as yeast, barm, or fermenting beer. [1913 Webster] Note: Ferments are of two kinds: ({a}) Formed or organized ferments. ({b}) Unorganized or structureless ferments. The latter are now called {enzymes} and were formerly called {soluble ferments} or {chemical ferments}. Ferments of the first class are as a rule simple microscopic vegetable organisms, and the fermentations which they engender are due to their growth and development; as, the {acetic ferment}, the {butyric ferment}, etc. See {Fermentation}. Ferments of the second class, on the other hand, are chemical substances; as a rule they are proteins soluble in glycerin and precipitated by alcohol. In action they are catalytic and, mainly, hydrolytic. Good examples are pepsin of the dastric juice, ptyalin of the salvia, and disease of malt. Before 1960 the term "ferment" to mean "enzyme" fell out of use. Enzymes are now known to be {globular protein}s, capable of catalyzing a wide variety of chemical reactions, not merely hydrolytic. The full set of enzymes causing production of ethyl alcohol from sugar has been identified and individually purified and studied. See {enzyme}. [1913 Webster +PJC] 2. Intestine motion; heat; tumult; agitation. [1913 Webster] Subdue and cool the ferment of desire. --Rogers. [1913 Webster] the nation is in a ferment. --Walpole. [1913 Webster] 3. A gentle internal motion of the constituent parts of a fluid; fermentation. [R.] [1913 Webster] Down to the lowest lees the ferment ran. --Thomson. [1913 Webster] {ferment oils}, volatile oils produced by the fermentation of plants, and not originally contained in them. These were the quintessences of the alchemists. --Ure. [1913 Webster]
A 1
A 1 \A 1\ ([=a] w[u^]n). A registry mark given by underwriters (as at Lloyd's) to ships in first-class condition. Inferior grades are indicated by A 2 and A 3. [1913 Webster] Note: A 1 is also applied colloquially to other things to imply superiority; prime; first-class; first-rate. [1913 Webster]
A Adansonia
Gum \Gum\, n. [OE. gomme, gumme, F. gomme, L. gummi and commis, fr. Gr. ?, prob. from an Egyptian form kam?; cf. It. {gomma}.] 1. A vegetable secretion of many trees or plants that hardens when it exudes, but is soluble in water; as, gum arabic; gum tragacanth; the gum of the cherry tree. Also, with less propriety, exudations that are not soluble in water; as, gum copal and gum sandarac, which are really resins. [1913 Webster] 2. (Bot.) See {Gum tree}, {below}. [1913 Webster] 3. A hive made of a section of a hollow gum tree; hence, any roughly made hive; also, a vessel or bin made of a hollow log. [Southern U. S.] [1913 Webster] 4. A rubber overshoe. [Local, U. S.] [1913 Webster] {Black gum}, {Blue gum}, {British gum}, etc. See under {Black}, {Blue}, etc. {Gum Acaroidea}, the resinous gum of the Australian grass tree ({Xanlhorrh[oe]a}). {Gum animal} (Zo["o]l.), the galago of West Africa; -- so called because it feeds on gums. See {Galago}. {Gum animi or anim['e]}. See {Anim['e]}. {Gum arabic}, a gum yielded mostly by several species of {Acacia} (chiefly {A. vera} and {A. Arabica}) growing in Africa and Southern Asia; -- called also {gum acacia}. East Indian gum arabic comes from a tree of the Orange family which bears the elephant apple. {Gum butea}, a gum yielded by the Indian plants {Butea frondosa} and {B. superba}, and used locally in tanning and in precipitating indigo. {Gum cistus}, a plant of the genus {Cistus} ({Cistus ladaniferus}), a species of rock rose. {Gum dragon}. See {Tragacanth}. {Gum elastic}, {Elastic gum}. See {Caoutchouc}. {Gum elemi}. See {Elemi}. {Gum juniper}. See {Sandarac}. {Gum kino}. See under {Kino}. {Gum lac}. See {Lac}. {Gum Ladanum}, a fragrant gum yielded by several Oriental species of Cistus or rock rose. {Gum passages}, sap receptacles extending through the parenchyma of certain plants ({Amygdalace[ae]}, {Cactace[ae]}, etc.), and affording passage for gum. {Gum pot}, a varnish maker's utensil for melting gum and mixing other ingredients. {Gum resin}, the milky juice of a plant solidified by exposure to air; one of certain inspissated saps, mixtures of, or having properties of, gum and resin; a resin containing more or less mucilaginous and gummy matter. {Gum sandarac}. See {Sandarac}. {Gum Senegal}, a gum similar to gum arabic, yielded by trees ({Acacia Verek} and {A. Adansoni["a]}) growing in the Senegal country, West Africa. {Gum tragacanth}. See {Tragacanth}. {Gum water}, a solution of gum, esp. of gum arabic, in water. {Gum wood}, the wood of any gum tree, esp. the wood of the {Eucalyptus piperita}, of New South Wales. [1913 Webster]
A affinis
Scaup \Scaup\ (sk[add]p), n. [See {Scalp} a bed of oysters or mussels.] 1. A bed or stratum of shellfish; scalp. [Scot.] [1913 Webster] 2. (Zo["o]l.) A scaup duck. See below. [1913 Webster] {Scaup duck} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of northern ducks of the genus {Aythya}, or {Fuligula}. The adult males are, in large part, black. The three North American species are: the greater scaup duck ({Aythya marila}, var. nearctica), called also {broadbill}, {bluebill}, {blackhead}, {flock duck}, {flocking fowl}, and {raft duck}; the lesser scaup duck ({A. affinis}), called also {little bluebill}, {river broadbill}, and {shuffler}; the tufted, or ring-necked, scaup duck ({A. collaris}), called also {black jack}, {ringneck}, {ringbill}, {ringbill shuffler}, etc. See Illust. of {Ring-necked duck}, under {Ring-necked}. The common European scaup, or mussel, duck ({A. marila}), closely resembles the American variety. [1913 Webster]
A alnifolia
Shad \Shad\ (sh[a^]d), n. sing. & pl. [AS. sceadda a kind of fish, akin to Prov. G. schade; cf. Ir. & Gael. sgadan a herring, W. ysgadan herrings; all perhaps akin to E. skate a fish.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of food fishes of the Herring family. The American species ({Alosa sapidissima} formerly {Clupea sapidissima}), which is abundant on the Atlantic coast and ascends the larger rivers in spring to spawn, is an important market fish. The European allice shad, or alose ({Alosa alosa} formerly {Clupea alosa}), and the twaite shad ({Alosa finta} formerly {Clupea finta}), are less important species. [Written also {chad}.] [1913 Webster] Note: The name is loosely applied, also, to several other fishes, as the gizzard shad (see under {Gizzard}), called also {mud shad}, {white-eyed shad}, and {winter shad}. [1913 Webster] {Hardboaded shad}, or {Yellow-tailed shad}, the menhaden. {Hickory shad}, or {Tailor shad}, the {mattowacca}. {Long-boned shad}, one of several species of important food fishes of the Bermudas and the West Indies, of the genus {Gerres}. {Shad bush} (Bot.), a name given to the North American shrubs or small trees of the rosaceous genus {Amelanchier} ({A. Canadensis}, and {A. alnifolia}) Their white racemose blossoms open in April or May, when the shad appear, and the edible berries (pomes) ripen in June or July, whence they are called Juneberries. The plant is also called {service tree}, and {Juneberry}. {Shad frog}, an American spotted frog ({Rana halecina}); -- so called because it usually appears at the time when the shad begin to run in the rivers. {Trout shad}, the squeteague. {White shad}, the common shad. [1913 Webster]
A Arabica
Gum \Gum\, n. [OE. gomme, gumme, F. gomme, L. gummi and commis, fr. Gr. ?, prob. from an Egyptian form kam?; cf. It. {gomma}.] 1. A vegetable secretion of many trees or plants that hardens when it exudes, but is soluble in water; as, gum arabic; gum tragacanth; the gum of the cherry tree. Also, with less propriety, exudations that are not soluble in water; as, gum copal and gum sandarac, which are really resins. [1913 Webster] 2. (Bot.) See {Gum tree}, {below}. [1913 Webster] 3. A hive made of a section of a hollow gum tree; hence, any roughly made hive; also, a vessel or bin made of a hollow log. [Southern U. S.] [1913 Webster] 4. A rubber overshoe. [Local, U. S.] [1913 Webster] {Black gum}, {Blue gum}, {British gum}, etc. See under {Black}, {Blue}, etc. {Gum Acaroidea}, the resinous gum of the Australian grass tree ({Xanlhorrh[oe]a}). {Gum animal} (Zo["o]l.), the galago of West Africa; -- so called because it feeds on gums. See {Galago}. {Gum animi or anim['e]}. See {Anim['e]}. {Gum arabic}, a gum yielded mostly by several species of {Acacia} (chiefly {A. vera} and {A. Arabica}) growing in Africa and Southern Asia; -- called also {gum acacia}. East Indian gum arabic comes from a tree of the Orange family which bears the elephant apple. {Gum butea}, a gum yielded by the Indian plants {Butea frondosa} and {B. superba}, and used locally in tanning and in precipitating indigo. {Gum cistus}, a plant of the genus {Cistus} ({Cistus ladaniferus}), a species of rock rose. {Gum dragon}. See {Tragacanth}. {Gum elastic}, {Elastic gum}. See {Caoutchouc}. {Gum elemi}. See {Elemi}. {Gum juniper}. See {Sandarac}. {Gum kino}. See under {Kino}. {Gum lac}. See {Lac}. {Gum Ladanum}, a fragrant gum yielded by several Oriental species of Cistus or rock rose. {Gum passages}, sap receptacles extending through the parenchyma of certain plants ({Amygdalace[ae]}, {Cactace[ae]}, etc.), and affording passage for gum. {Gum pot}, a varnish maker's utensil for melting gum and mixing other ingredients. {Gum resin}, the milky juice of a plant solidified by exposure to air; one of certain inspissated saps, mixtures of, or having properties of, gum and resin; a resin containing more or less mucilaginous and gummy matter. {Gum sandarac}. See {Sandarac}. {Gum Senegal}, a gum similar to gum arabic, yielded by trees ({Acacia Verek} and {A. Adansoni["a]}) growing in the Senegal country, West Africa. {Gum tragacanth}. See {Tragacanth}. {Gum water}, a solution of gum, esp. of gum arabic, in water. {Gum wood}, the wood of any gum tree, esp. the wood of the {Eucalyptus piperita}, of New South Wales. [1913 Webster]
A atricapillus
Goshawk \Gos"hawk`\, n. [AS. g[=o]shafuc, lit., goosehawk; or Icel. g[=a]shaukr. See {Goose}, and {Hawk} the bird.] (Zo["o]l.) Any large hawk of the genus {Astur}, of which many species and varieties are known. The European ({Astur palumbarius}) and the American ({A. atricapillus}) are the best known species. They are noted for their powerful flight, activity, and courage. The Australian goshawk ({A. Nov[ae]-Hollandi[ae]}) is pure white. [1913 Webster]
A B C
A B C \A B C"\ ([=a] b[=e] s[=e]"). 1. The first three letters of the alphabet, used for the whole alphabet. [1913 Webster] 2. A primer for teaching the alphabet and first elements of reading. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 3. The simplest rudiments of any subject; as, the A B C of finance. [1913 Webster] {A B C book}, a primer. --Shak. [1913 Webster] ||
A B C book
A B C \A B C"\ ([=a] b[=e] s[=e]"). 1. The first three letters of the alphabet, used for the whole alphabet. [1913 Webster] 2. A primer for teaching the alphabet and first elements of reading. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 3. The simplest rudiments of any subject; as, the A B C of finance. [1913 Webster] {A B C book}, a primer. --Shak. [1913 Webster] ||
A baker's dozen
Baker \Bak"er\, n. [AS. b[ae]cere. See {Bake}, v. t.] 1. One whose business it is to bake bread, biscuit, etc. [1913 Webster] 2. A portable oven in which baking is done. [U.S.] [1913 Webster] {A baker's dozen}, thirteen. {Baker foot}, a distorted foot. [Obs.] --Jer. Taylor. {Baker's itch}, a rash on the back of the hand, caused by the irritating properties of yeast. {Baker's salt}, the subcarbonate of ammonia, sometimes used instead of soda, in making bread. [1913 Webster]
A baker's dozen
Dozen \Doz"en\ (d[u^]z"'n), n.; pl. {Dozen} (before another noun), {Dozens} (d[u^]z"'nz). [OE. doseine, dosein, OF. doseine, F. douzaine, fr. douze twelve, fr. L. duodecim; duo two + decem ten. See {Two}, {Ten}, and cf. {Duodecimal}.] 1. A collection of twelve objects; a tale or set of twelve; with or without of before the substantive which follows. ``Some six or seven dozen of Scots.'' ``A dozen of shirts to your back.'' ``A dozen sons.'' ``Half a dozen friends.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. An indefinite small number. --Milton. [1913 Webster] {A baker's dozen}, thirteen; -- called also a {long dozen}. [1913 Webster]
A beating wind
Beat \Beat\, v. i. 1. To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly. [1913 Webster] The men of the city . . . beat at the door. --Judges. xix. 22. [1913 Webster] 2. To move with pulsation or throbbing. [1913 Webster] A thousand hearts beat happily. --Byron. [1913 Webster] 3. To come or act with violence; to dash or fall with force; to strike anything, as rain, wind, and waves do. [1913 Webster] Sees rolling tempests vainly beat below. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] They [winds] beat at the crazy casement. --Longfellow. [1913 Webster] The sun beat upon the head of Jonah, that he fainted, and wished in himself to die. --Jonah iv. 8. [1913 Webster] Public envy seemeth to beat chiefly upon ministers. --Bacon. [1913 Webster] 4. To be in agitation or doubt. [Poetic] [1913 Webster] To still my beating mind. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 5. (Naut.) To make progress against the wind, by sailing in a zigzag line or traverse. [1913 Webster] 6. To make a sound when struck; as, the drums beat. [1913 Webster] 7. (Mil.) To make a succession of strokes on a drum; as, the drummers beat to call soldiers to their quarters. [1913 Webster] 8. (Acoustics & Mus.) To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; -- said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison. [1913 Webster] {A beating wind} (Naut.), a wind which necessitates tacking in order to make progress. {To beat about}, to try to find; to search by various means or ways. --Addison. {To beat about the bush}, to approach a subject circuitously. {To beat up and down} (Hunting), to run first one way and then another; -- said of a stag. {To beat up for recruits}, to go diligently about in order to get helpers or participators in an enterprise. {To beat the rap}, to be acquitted of an accusation; -- especially, by some sly or deceptive means, rather than to be proven innocent. [1913 Webster]
A bevel angle
Bevel \Bev"el\, a. 1. Having the slant of a bevel; slanting. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence: Morally distorted; not upright. [Poetic] [1913 Webster] I may be straight, though they themselves be bevel. --Shak. [1913 Webster] {A bevel angle}, any angle other than one of 90[deg]. {Bevel wheel}, a cogwheel whose working face is oblique to the axis. --Knight. [1913 Webster]
a bifilar
Bifilar \Bi*fi"lar\, a. [Pref. bi- + filar.] Two-threaded; involving the use of two threads; as, bifilar suspension; a bifilar balance. [1913 Webster] {Bifilar micrometer} (often called {a bifilar}), an instrument form measuring minute distances or angles by means of two very minute threads (usually spider lines), one of which, at least, is movable; -- more commonly called a {filar micrometer}. [1913 Webster]
A bill of adventure
Adventure \Ad*ven"ture\ (?; 135), n. [OE. aventure, aunter, anter, F. aventure, fr. LL. adventura, fr. L. advenire, adventum, to arrive, which in the Romance languages took the sense of ``to happen, befall.'' See Advene.] [1913 Webster] 1. That which happens without design; chance; hazard; hap; hence, chance of danger or loss. [1913 Webster] Nay, a far less good to man it will be found, if she must, at all adventures, be fastened upon him individually. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. Risk; danger; peril. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] He was in great adventure of his life. --Berners. [1913 Webster] 3. The encountering of risks; hazardous and striking enterprise; a bold undertaking, in which hazards are to be encountered, and the issue is staked upon unforeseen events; a daring feat. [1913 Webster] He loved excitement and adventure. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster] 4. A remarkable occurrence; a striking event; a stirring incident; as, the adventures of one's life. --Bacon. [1913 Webster] 5. A mercantile or speculative enterprise of hazard; a venture; a shipment by a merchant on his own account. [1913 Webster] {A bill of adventure} (Com.), a writing setting forth that the goods shipped are at the owner's risk. [1913 Webster] Syn: Undertaking; enterprise; venture; event. [1913 Webster]
A blind boil
Boil \Boil\, n. [Influenced by boil, v. See {Beal}, {Bile}.] A hard, painful, inflamed tumor, which, on suppuration, discharges pus, mixed with blood, and discloses a small fibrous mass of dead tissue, called the core. [1913 Webster] {A blind boil}, one that suppurates imperfectly, or fails to come to a head. {Delhi boil} (Med.), a peculiar affection of the skin, probably parasitic in origin, prevailing in India (as among the British troops) and especially at Delhi. [1913 Webster]
A block of shares
Block \Block\ (bl[o^]k), n. [OE. blok; cf. F. bloc (fr. OHG.), D. & Dan. blok, Sw. & G. block, OHG. bloch. There is also an OHG. bloch, biloh; bi by + the same root as that of E. lock. Cf. {Block}, v. t., {Blockade}, and see {Lock}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A piece of wood more or less bulky; a solid mass of wood, stone, etc., usually with one or more plane, or approximately plane, faces; as, a block on which a butcher chops his meat; a block by which to mount a horse; children's playing blocks, etc. [1913 Webster] Now all our neighbors' chimneys smoke, And Christmas blocks are burning. --Wither. [1913 Webster] All her labor was but as a block Left in the quarry. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster] 2. The solid piece of wood on which condemned persons lay their necks when they are beheaded. [1913 Webster] Noble heads which have been brought to the block. --E. Everett. [1913 Webster] 3. The wooden mold on which hats, bonnets, etc., are shaped. Hence: The pattern or shape of a hat. [1913 Webster] He wears his faith but as the fashion of his hat; it ever changes with the next block. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 4. A large or long building divided into separate houses or shops, or a number of houses or shops built in contact with each other so as to form one building; a row of houses or shops. [1913 Webster] 5. A square, or portion of a city inclosed by streets, whether occupied by buildings or not. [1913 Webster] The new city was laid out in rectangular blocks, each block containing thirty building lots. Such an average block, comprising 282 houses and covering nine acres of ground, exists in Oxford Street. --Lond. Quart. Rev. [1913 Webster] 6. A grooved pulley or sheave incased in a frame or shell which is provided with a hook, eye, or strap, by which it may be attached to an object. It is used to change the direction of motion, as in raising a heavy object that can not be conveniently reached, and also, when two or more such sheaves are compounded, to change the rate of motion, or to exert increased force; -- used especially in the rigging of ships, and in tackles. [1913 Webster] 7. (Falconry) The perch on which a bird of prey is kept. [1913 Webster] 8. Any obstruction, or cause of obstruction; a stop; a hindrance; an obstacle; -- also called {blockage}; as, a block in the way; a block in an artery; a block in a nerve; a block in a biochemical pathway. [1913 Webster] 9. A piece of box or other wood for engravers' work. [1913 Webster] 10. (Print.) A piece of hard wood (as mahogany or cherry) on which a stereotype or electrotype plate is mounted to make it type high. [1913 Webster] 11. A blockhead; a stupid fellow; a dolt. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] What a block art thou ! --Shak. [1913 Webster] 12. A section of a railroad where the block system is used. See {Block system}, below. [1913 Webster] 13. In Australia, one of the large lots into which public land, when opened to settlers, is divided by the government surveyors. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] 14. (Cricket) (a) The position of a player or bat when guarding the wicket. (b) A block hole. (c) The popping crease. [R.] [Webster 1913 Suppl.] 15. a number of individual items sold as a unit; as, a block of airline ticketes; a block of hotel rooms; a block of stock. [PJC] 16. the length of one side of a city block[5], traversed along any side; as, to walk three blocks ahead and turn left at the corner. [PJC] 17. a halt in a mental process, especially one due to stress, memory lapse, confusion, etc.; as, a writer's block; to have a block in remembering a name. [PJC] 18. (computers) a quantity of binary-encoded information transferred, or stored, as a unit to, from, or on a data storage device; as, to divide a disk into 512-byte blocks. [PJC] 19. (computers) a number of locations in a random-access memory allocated to storage of specific data; as, to allocate a block of 1024 bytes for the stack. [PJC] {A block of shares} (Stock Exchange), a large number of shares in a stock company, sold in a lump. --Bartlett. {Block printing}. (a) A mode of printing (common in China and Japan) from engraved boards by means of a sheet of paper laid on the linked surface and rubbed with a brush. --S. W. Williams. (b) A method of printing cotton cloth and paper hangings with colors, by pressing them upon an engraved surface coated with coloring matter. {Block system} on railways, a system by which the track is divided into sections of three or four miles, and trains are so run by the guidance of electric signals that no train enters a section or block before the preceding train has left it. {Back blocks}, Australian pastoral country which is remote from the seacoast or from a river. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
A bone of contention
Bone \Bone\ (b[=o]n; 110), n. [OE. bon, ban, AS. b[=a]n; akin to Icel. bein, Sw. ben, Dan. & D. been, G. bein bone, leg; cf. Icel. beinn straight.] 1. (Anat.) The hard, calcified tissue of the skeleton of vertebrate animals, consisting very largely of calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, and gelatine; as, blood and bone. [1913 Webster] Note: Even in the hardest parts of bone there are many minute cavities containing living matter and connected by minute canals, some of which connect with larger canals through which blood vessels ramify. [1913 Webster] 2. One of the pieces or parts of an animal skeleton; as, a rib or a thigh bone; a bone of the arm or leg; also, any fragment of bony substance. (pl.) The frame or skeleton of the body. [1913 Webster] 3. Anything made of bone, as a bobbin for weaving bone lace. [1913 Webster] 4. pl. Two or four pieces of bone held between the fingers and struck together to make a kind of music. [1913 Webster] 5. pl. Dice. [1913 Webster] 6. Whalebone; hence, a piece of whalebone or of steel for a corset. [1913 Webster] 7. Fig.: The framework of anything. [1913 Webster] {A bone of contention}, a subject of contention or dispute. {A bone to pick}, something to investigate, or to busy one's self about; a dispute to be settled (with some one). {Bone ash}, the residue from calcined bones; -- used for making cupels, and for cleaning jewelry. {Bone black} (Chem.), the black, carbonaceous substance into which bones are converted by calcination in close vessels; -- called also {animal charcoal}. It is used as a decolorizing material in filtering sirups, extracts, etc., and as a black pigment. See {Ivory black}, under {Black}. {Bone cave}, a cave in which are found bones of extinct or recent animals, mingled sometimes with the works and bones of man. --Am. Cyc. {Bone dust}, ground or pulverized bones, used as a fertilizer. {Bone earth} (Chem.), the earthy residuum after the calcination of bone, consisting chiefly of phosphate of calcium. {Bone lace}, a lace made of linen thread, so called because woven with bobbins of bone. {Bone oil}, an oil obtained by, heating bones (as in the manufacture of bone black), and remarkable for containing the nitrogenous bases, pyridine and quinoline, and their derivatives; -- also called {Dippel's oil}. {Bone setter}. Same as {Bonesetter}. See in the Vocabulary. {Bone shark} (Zo["o]l.), the basking shark. {Bone spavin}. See under {Spavin}. {Bone turquoise}, fossil bone or tooth of a delicate blue color, sometimes used as an imitation of true turquoise. {Bone whale} (Zo["o]l.), a right whale. {To be upon the bones of}, to attack. [Obs.] {To make no bones}, to make no scruple; not to hesitate. [Low] {To pick a bone with}, to quarrel with, as dogs quarrel over a bone; to settle a disagreement. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]
A bone to pick
Bone \Bone\ (b[=o]n; 110), n. [OE. bon, ban, AS. b[=a]n; akin to Icel. bein, Sw. ben, Dan. & D. been, G. bein bone, leg; cf. Icel. beinn straight.] 1. (Anat.) The hard, calcified tissue of the skeleton of vertebrate animals, consisting very largely of calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, and gelatine; as, blood and bone. [1913 Webster] Note: Even in the hardest parts of bone there are many minute cavities containing living matter and connected by minute canals, some of which connect with larger canals through which blood vessels ramify. [1913 Webster] 2. One of the pieces or parts of an animal skeleton; as, a rib or a thigh bone; a bone of the arm or leg; also, any fragment of bony substance. (pl.) The frame or skeleton of the body. [1913 Webster] 3. Anything made of bone, as a bobbin for weaving bone lace. [1913 Webster] 4. pl. Two or four pieces of bone held between the fingers and struck together to make a kind of music. [1913 Webster] 5. pl. Dice. [1913 Webster] 6. Whalebone; hence, a piece of whalebone or of steel for a corset. [1913 Webster] 7. Fig.: The framework of anything. [1913 Webster] {A bone of contention}, a subject of contention or dispute. {A bone to pick}, something to investigate, or to busy one's self about; a dispute to be settled (with some one). {Bone ash}, the residue from calcined bones; -- used for making cupels, and for cleaning jewelry. {Bone black} (Chem.), the black, carbonaceous substance into which bones are converted by calcination in close vessels; -- called also {animal charcoal}. It is used as a decolorizing material in filtering sirups, extracts, etc., and as a black pigment. See {Ivory black}, under {Black}. {Bone cave}, a cave in which are found bones of extinct or recent animals, mingled sometimes with the works and bones of man. --Am. Cyc. {Bone dust}, ground or pulverized bones, used as a fertilizer. {Bone earth} (Chem.), the earthy residuum after the calcination of bone, consisting chiefly of phosphate of calcium. {Bone lace}, a lace made of linen thread, so called because woven with bobbins of bone. {Bone oil}, an oil obtained by, heating bones (as in the manufacture of bone black), and remarkable for containing the nitrogenous bases, pyridine and quinoline, and their derivatives; -- also called {Dippel's oil}. {Bone setter}. Same as {Bonesetter}. See in the Vocabulary. {Bone shark} (Zo["o]l.), the basking shark. {Bone spavin}. See under {Spavin}. {Bone turquoise}, fossil bone or tooth of a delicate blue color, sometimes used as an imitation of true turquoise. {Bone whale} (Zo["o]l.), a right whale. {To be upon the bones of}, to attack. [Obs.] {To make no bones}, to make no scruple; not to hesitate. [Low] {To pick a bone with}, to quarrel with, as dogs quarrel over a bone; to settle a disagreement. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]
A Bonhami
Sand \Sand\, n. [AS. sand; akin to D. zand, G. sand, OHG. sant, Icel. sandr, Dan. & Sw. sand, Gr. ?.] 1. Fine particles of stone, esp. of siliceous stone, but not reduced to dust; comminuted stone in the form of loose grains, which are not coherent when wet. [1913 Webster] That finer matter, called sand, is no other than very small pebbles. --Woodward. [1913 Webster] 2. A single particle of such stone. [R.] --Shak. [1913 Webster] 3. The sand in the hourglass; hence, a moment or interval of time; the term or extent of one's life. [1913 Webster] The sands are numbered that make up my life. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 4. pl. Tracts of land consisting of sand, like the deserts of Arabia and Africa; also, extensive tracts of sand exposed by the ebb of the tide. ``The Libyan sands.'' --Milton. ``The sands o' Dee.'' --C. Kingsley. [1913 Webster] 5. Courage; pluck; grit. [Slang] [1913 Webster] {Sand badger} (Zo["o]l.), the Japanese badger ({Meles ankuma}). {Sand bag}. (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as in fortification, for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand, used as a club by assassins. {Sand ball}, soap mixed with sand, made into a ball for use at the toilet. {Sand bath}. (a) (Chem.) A vessel of hot sand in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated are partially immersed. (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in hot sand. {Sand bed}, a thick layer of sand, whether deposited naturally or artificially; specifically, a thick layer of sand into which molten metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. {Sand birds} (Zo["o]l.), a collective name for numerous species of limicoline birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many others; -- called also {shore birds}. {Sand blast}, a process of engraving and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand against them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in the process. {Sand box}. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover, for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent slipping. {Sand-box tree} (Bot.), a tropical American tree ({Hura crepitans}). Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which, when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds. See Illust. of {Regma}. {Sand bug} (Zo["o]l.), an American anomuran crustacean ({Hippa talpoidea}) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is often used as bait by fishermen. See Illust. under {Anomura}. {Sand canal} (Zo["o]l.), a tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and connecting the oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It appears to be excretory in function. {Sand cock} (Zo["o]l.), the redshank. [Prov. Eng.] {Sand collar}. (Zo["o]l.) Same as {Sand saucer}, below. {Sand crab}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or ocypodian. {Sand crack} (Far.), a crack extending downward from the coronet, in the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness. {Sand cricket} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of large terrestrial crickets of the genus {Stenophelmatus} and allied genera, native of the sandy plains of the Western United States. {Sand cusk} (Zo["o]l.), any ophidioid fish. See {Illust.} under {Ophidioid}. {Sand dab} (Zo["o]l.), a small American flounder ({Limanda ferruginea}); -- called also {rusty dab}. The name is also applied locally to other allied species. {Sand darter} (Zo["o]l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the Ohio valley ({Ammocrypta pellucida}). {Sand dollar} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on sandy bottoms, especially {Echinarachnius parma} of the American coast. {Sand drift}, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand. {Sand eel}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific Ocean fish of the genus {Gonorhynchus}, having barbels about the mouth. {Sand flag}, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. {Sand flea}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy places, especially the common dog flea. (b) The chigoe. (c) Any leaping amphipod crustacean; a beach flea, or orchestian. See {Beach flea}, under {Beach}. {Sand flood}, a vast body of sand borne along by the wind. --James Bruce. {Sand fluke}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The sandnecker. (b) The European smooth dab ({Pleuronectes microcephalus}); -- called also {kitt}, {marysole}, {smear dab}, {town dab}. {Sand fly} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus {Simulium}, abounding on sandy shores, especially {Simulium nocivum} of the United States. They are very troublesome on account of their biting habits. Called also {no-see-um}, {punky}, and {midge}. {Sand gall}. (Geol.) See {Sand pipe}, below. {Sand grass} (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in sand; especially, a tufted grass ({Triplasis purpurea}) with numerous bearded joints, and acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic coast. {Sand grouse} (Zo["o]l.), any one of many species of Old World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both grouse and pigeons. Called also {rock grouse}, {rock pigeon}, and {ganga}. They mostly belong to the genus {Pterocles}, as the common Indian species ({P. exustus}). The large sand grouse ({P. arenarius}), the painted sand grouse ({P. fasciatus}), and the pintail sand grouse ({P. alchata}) are also found in India. See Illust. under {Pterocletes}. {Sand hill}, a hill of sand; a dune. {Sand-hill crane} (Zo["o]l.), the American brown crane ({Grus Mexicana}). {Sand hopper} (Zo["o]l.), a beach flea; an orchestian. {Sand hornet} (Zo["o]l.), a sand wasp. {Sand lark}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small lark ({Alaudala raytal}), native of India. (b) A small sandpiper, or plover, as the ringneck, the sanderling, and the common European sandpiper. (c) The Australian red-capped dotterel ({[AE]gialophilus ruficapillus}); -- called also {red-necked plover}. {Sand launce} (Zo["o]l.), a lant, or launce. {Sand lizard} (Zo["o]l.), a common European lizard ({Lacerta agilis}). {Sand martin} (Zo["o]l.), the bank swallow. {Sand mole} (Zo["o]l.), the coast rat. {Sand monitor} (Zo["o]l.), a large Egyptian lizard ({Monitor arenarius}) which inhabits dry localities. {Sand mouse} (Zo["o]l.), the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] {Sand myrtle}. (Bot.) See under {Myrtle}. {Sand partridge} (Zo["o]l.), either of two small Asiatic partridges of the genus {Ammoperdix}. The wings are long and the tarsus is spurless. One species ({A. Heeji}) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The other species ({A. Bonhami}), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also {seesee partridge}, and {teehoo}. {Sand picture}, a picture made by putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. {Sand pike}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. {Sand pillar}, a sand storm which takes the form of a whirling pillar in its progress in desert tracts like those of the Sahara and Mongolia. {Sand pipe} (Geol.), a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in depth, occurring especially in calcareous rocks, and often filled with gravel, sand, etc.; -- called also {sand gall}. {Sand pride} (Zo["o]l.), a small British lamprey now considered to be the young of larger species; -- called also {sand prey}. {Sand pump}, in artesian well boring, a long, slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for raising sand from the well. {Sand rat} (Zo["o]l.), the pocket gopher. {Sand rock}, a rock made of cemented sand. {Sand runner} (Zo["o]l.), the turnstone. {Sand saucer} (Zo["o]l.), the mass of egg capsules, or o["o]thec[ae], of any mollusk of the genus {Natica} and allied genera. It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand; -- called also {sand collar}. {Sand screw} (Zo["o]l.), an amphipod crustacean ({Lepidactylis arenarius}), which burrows in the sandy seabeaches of Europe and America. {Sand shark} (Zo["o]l.), an American shark ({Odontaspis littoralis}) found on the sandy coasts of the Eastern United States; -- called also {gray shark}, and {dogfish shark}. See Illust. under {Remora}. {Sand skink} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus {Seps}; as, the ocellated sand skink ({Seps ocellatus}) of Southern Europe. {Sand skipper} (Zo["o]l.), a beach flea, or orchestian. {Sand smelt} (Zo["o]l.), a silverside. {Sand snake}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus {Eryx}, native of Southern Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially {E. jaculus} of India and {E. Johnii}, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African snake of the genus {Psammophis}, especially {P. sibilans}. {Sand snipe} (Zo["o]l.), the sandpiper. {Sand star} (Zo["o]l.), an ophiurioid starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. {Sand storm}, a cloud of sand driven violently by the wind. {Sand sucker}, the sandnecker. {Sand swallow} (Zo["o]l.), the bank swallow. See under {Bank}. {Sand trap}, (Golf) a shallow pit on a golf course having a layer of sand in it, usually located near a green, and designed to function as a hazard, due to the difficulty of hitting balls effectively from such a position. {Sand tube}, a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of vitrified sand, produced by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b) (Zo["o]l.) Any tube made of cemented sand. (c) (Zo["o]l.) In starfishes, a tube having calcareous particles in its wall, which connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. {Sand viper}. (Zo["o]l.) See {Hognose snake}. {Sand wasp} (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of hymenopterous insects belonging to the families {Pompilid[ae]} and {Spherid[ae]}, which dig burrows in sand. The female provisions the nest with insects or spiders which she paralyzes by stinging, and which serve as food for her young. [1913 Webster]
A buck of the first head
Head \Head\ (h[e^]d), n. [OE. hed, heved, heaved, AS. he['a]fod; akin to D. hoofd, OHG. houbit, G. haupt, Icel. h["o]fu[eth], Sw. hufvud, Dan. hoved, Goth. haubi[thorn]. The word does not correspond regularly to L. caput head (cf. E. {Chief}, {Cadet}, {Capital}), and its origin is unknown.] 1. The anterior or superior part of an animal, containing the brain, or chief ganglia of the nervous system, the mouth, and in the higher animals, the chief sensory organs; poll; cephalon. [1913 Webster] 2. The uppermost, foremost, or most important part of an inanimate object; such a part as may be considered to resemble the head of an animal; often, also, the larger, thicker, or heavier part or extremity, in distinction from the smaller or thinner part, or from the point or edge; as, the head of a cane, a nail, a spear, an ax, a mast, a sail, a ship; that which covers and closes the top or the end of a hollow vessel; as, the head of a cask or a steam boiler. [1913 Webster] 3. The place where the head should go; as, the head of a bed, of a grave, etc.; the head of a carriage, that is, the hood which covers the head. [1913 Webster] 4. The most prominent or important member of any organized body; the chief; the leader; as, the head of a college, a school, a church, a state, and the like. ``Their princes and heads.'' --Robynson (More's Utopia). [1913 Webster] The heads of the chief sects of philosophy. --Tillotson. [1913 Webster] Your head I him appoint. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 5. The place or honor, or of command; the most important or foremost position; the front; as, the head of the table; the head of a column of soldiers. [1913 Webster] An army of fourscore thousand troops, with the duke of Marlborough at the head of them. --Addison. [1913 Webster] 6. Each one among many; an individual; -- often used in a plural sense; as, a thousand head of cattle. [1913 Webster] It there be six millions of people, there are about four acres for every head. --Graunt. [1913 Webster] 7. The seat of the intellect; the brain; the understanding; the mental faculties; as, a good head, that is, a good mind; it never entered his head, it did not occur to him; of his own head, of his own thought or will. [1913 Webster] Men who had lost both head and heart. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster] 8. The source, fountain, spring, or beginning, as of a stream or river; as, the head of the Nile; hence, the altitude of the source, or the height of the surface, as of water, above a given place, as above an orifice at which it issues, and the pressure resulting from the height or from motion; sometimes also, the quantity in reserve; as, a mill or reservoir has a good head of water, or ten feet head; also, that part of a gulf or bay most remote from the outlet or the sea. [1913 Webster] 9. A headland; a promontory; as, Gay Head. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 10. A separate part, or topic, of a discourse; a theme to be expanded; a subdivision; as, the heads of a sermon. [1913 Webster] 11. Culminating point or crisis; hence, strength; force; height. [1913 Webster] Ere foul sin, gathering head, shall break into corruption. --Shak. [1913 Webster] The indisposition which has long hung upon me, is at last grown to such a head, that it must quickly make an end of me or of itself. --Addison. [1913 Webster] 12. Power; armed force. [1913 Webster] My lord, my lord, the French have gathered head. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 13. A headdress; a covering of the head; as, a laced head; a head of hair. --Swift. [1913 Webster] 14. An ear of wheat, barley, or of one of the other small cereals. [1913 Webster] 15. (Bot.) (a) A dense cluster of flowers, as in clover, daisies, thistles; a capitulum. (b) A dense, compact mass of leaves, as in a cabbage or a lettuce plant. [1913 Webster] 16. The antlers of a deer. [1913 Webster] 17. A rounded mass of foam which rises on a pot of beer or other effervescing liquor. --Mortimer. [1913 Webster] 18. pl. Tiles laid at the eaves of a house. --Knight. [1913 Webster] Note: Head is often used adjectively or in self-explaining combinations; as, head gear or headgear, head rest. Cf. {Head}, a. [1913 Webster] {A buck of the first head}, a male fallow deer in its fifth year, when it attains its complete set of antlers. --Shak. {By the head}. (Naut.) See under {By}. {Elevator head}, {Feed head}, etc. See under {Elevator}, {Feed}, etc. {From head to foot}, through the whole length of a man; completely; throughout. ``Arm me, audacity, from head to foot.'' --Shak. {Head and ears}, with the whole person; deeply; completely; as, he was head and ears in debt or in trouble. [Colloq.] {Head fast}. (Naut.) See 5th {Fast}. {Head kidney} (Anat.), the most anterior of the three pairs of embryonic renal organs developed in most vertebrates; the pronephros. {Head money}, a capitation tax; a poll tax. --Milton. {Head pence}, a poll tax. [Obs.] {Head sea}, a sea that meets the head of a vessel or rolls against her course. {Head and shoulders}. (a) By force; violently; as, to drag one, head and shoulders. ``They bring in every figure of speech, head and shoulders.'' --Felton. (b) By the height of the head and shoulders; hence, by a great degree or space; by far; much; as, he is head and shoulders above them. {Heads or tails} or {Head or tail}, this side or that side; this thing or that; -- a phrase used in throwing a coin to decide a choice, question, or stake, head being the side of the coin bearing the effigy or principal figure (or, in case there is no head or face on either side, that side which has the date on it), and tail the other side. {Neither head nor tail}, neither beginning nor end; neither this thing nor that; nothing distinct or definite; -- a phrase used in speaking of what is indefinite or confused; as, they made neither head nor tail of the matter. [Colloq.] {Head wind}, a wind that blows in a direction opposite the vessel's course. {off the top of my head}, from quick recollection, or as an approximation; without research or calculation; -- a phrase used when giving quick and approximate answers to questions, to indicate that a response is not necessarily accurate. {Out of one's own head}, according to one's own idea; without advice or co["o]peration of another. {Over the head of}, beyond the comprehension of. --M. Arnold. {to go over the head of (a person)}, to appeal to a person superior to (a person) in line of command. {To be out of one's head}, to be temporarily insane. {To come or draw to a head}. See under {Come}, {Draw}. {To give (one) the head}, or {To give head}, to let go, or to give up, control; to free from restraint; to give license. ``He gave his able horse the head.'' --Shak. ``He has so long given his unruly passions their head.'' --South. {To his head}, before his face. ``An uncivil answer from a son to a father, from an obliged person to a benefactor, is a greater indecency than if an enemy should storm his house or revile him to his head.'' --Jer. Taylor. {To lay heads together}, to consult; to conspire. {To lose one's head}, to lose presence of mind. {To make head}, or {To make head against}, to resist with success; to advance. {To show one's head}, to appear. --Shak. {To turn head}, to turn the face or front. ``The ravishers turn head, the fight renews.'' --Dryden. [1913 Webster]
A butt's length
Butt \Butt\, But \But\, n. [F. but butt, aim (cf. butte knoll), or bout, OF. bot, end, extremity, fr. boter, buter, to push, butt, strike, F. bouter; of German origin; cf. OHG. b[=o]zan, akin to E. beat. See {Beat}, v. t.] 1. A limit; a bound; a goal; the extreme bound; the end. [1913 Webster] Here is my journey's end, here my butt And very sea mark of my utmost sail. --Shak. [1913 Webster] Note: As applied to land, the word is nearly synonymous with mete, and signifies properly the end line or boundary; the abuttal. [1913 Webster] 2. The larger or thicker end of anything; the blunt end, in distinction from the sharp end; as, the butt of a rifle. Formerly also spelled {but}. See 2nd {but}, n. sense 2. [1913 Webster +PJC] 3. A mark to be shot at; a target. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] The groom his fellow groom at butts defies, And bends his bow, and levels with his eyes. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] 4. A person at whom ridicule, jest, or contempt is directed; as, the butt of the company. [1913 Webster] I played a sentence or two at my butt, which I thought very smart. --Addison. [1913 Webster] 5. A push, thrust, or sudden blow, given by the head of an animal; as, the butt of a ram. [1913 Webster] 6. A thrust in fencing. [1913 Webster] To prove who gave the fairer butt, John shows the chalk on Robert's coat. --Prior. [1913 Webster] 7. A piece of land left unplowed at the end of a field. [1913 Webster] The hay was growing upon headlands and butts in cornfields. --Burrill. [1913 Webster] 8. (Mech.) (a) A joint where the ends of two objects come squarely together without scarfing or chamfering; -- also called {butt joint}. (b) The end of a connecting rod or other like piece, to which the boxing is attached by the strap, cotter, and gib. (c) The portion of a half-coupling fastened to the end of a hose. [1913 Webster] 9. (Shipbuilding) The joint where two planks in a strake meet. [1913 Webster] 10. (Carp.) A kind of hinge used in hanging doors, etc.; -- so named because fastened on the edge of the door, which butts against the casing, instead of on its face, like the strap hinge; also called {butt hinge}. [1913 Webster] 11. (Leather Trade) The thickest and stoutest part of tanned oxhides, used for soles of boots, harness, trunks. [1913 Webster] 12. The hut or shelter of the person who attends to the targets in rifle practice. [1913 Webster] 13. The buttocks; as, get up off your butt and get to work; -- used as a euphemism, less objectionable than {ass}. [slang] Syn: ass, rear end, derriere, behind, rump, heinie. [PJC] {Butt chain} (Saddlery), a short chain attached to the end of a tug. {Butt end}. The thicker end of anything. See {But end}, under 2d {But}. [1913 Webster] Amen; and make me die a good old man! That's the butt end of a mother's blessing. --Shak. [1913 Webster] {A butt's length}, the ordinary distance from the place of shooting to the butt, or mark. {Butts and bounds} (Conveyancing), abuttals and boundaries. In lands of the ordinary rectangular shape, butts are the lines at the ends (F. bouts), and bounds are those on the sides, or sidings, as they were formerly termed. --Burrill. {Bead and butt}. See under {Bead}. {Butt and butt}, joining end to end without overlapping, as planks. {Butt weld} (Mech.), a butt joint, made by welding together the flat ends, or edges, of a piece of iron or steel, or of separate pieces, without having them overlap. See {Weld}. {Full butt}, headfirst with full force. [Colloq.] ``The corporal . . . ran full butt at the lieutenant.'' --Marryat. [1913 Webster]
A Canadensis
Shad \Shad\ (sh[a^]d), n. sing. & pl. [AS. sceadda a kind of fish, akin to Prov. G. schade; cf. Ir. & Gael. sgadan a herring, W. ysgadan herrings; all perhaps akin to E. skate a fish.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of food fishes of the Herring family. The American species ({Alosa sapidissima} formerly {Clupea sapidissima}), which is abundant on the Atlantic coast and ascends the larger rivers in spring to spawn, is an important market fish. The European allice shad, or alose ({Alosa alosa} formerly {Clupea alosa}), and the twaite shad ({Alosa finta} formerly {Clupea finta}), are less important species. [Written also {chad}.] [1913 Webster] Note: The name is loosely applied, also, to several other fishes, as the gizzard shad (see under {Gizzard}), called also {mud shad}, {white-eyed shad}, and {winter shad}. [1913 Webster] {Hardboaded shad}, or {Yellow-tailed shad}, the menhaden. {Hickory shad}, or {Tailor shad}, the {mattowacca}. {Long-boned shad}, one of several species of important food fishes of the Bermudas and the West Indies, of the genus {Gerres}. {Shad bush} (Bot.), a name given to the North American shrubs or small trees of the rosaceous genus {Amelanchier} ({A. Canadensis}, and {A. alnifolia}) Their white racemose blossoms open in April or May, when the shad appear, and the edible berries (pomes) ripen in June or July, whence they are called Juneberries. The plant is also called {service tree}, and {Juneberry}. {Shad frog}, an American spotted frog ({Rana halecina}); -- so called because it usually appears at the time when the shad begin to run in the rivers. {Trout shad}, the squeteague. {White shad}, the common shad. [1913 Webster]
A capful of wind
Capful \Cap"ful\, n.; pl. {Capfuls}. As much as will fill a cap. [1913 Webster] +PJC {A capful of wind} (Naut.), a light puff of wind. [1913 Webster] ||
A cappella
A cappella \A cap*pel"la\ [It. See {Chapel}.] (Mus.) (a) In church or chapel style; -- said of compositions sung in the old church style, without instrumental accompaniment; as, a mass a capella, i. e., a mass purely vocal. (b) A time indication, equivalent to alla breve. [1913 Webster]
A cast of the eye
Cast \Cast\, n. [Cf. Icel., Dan., & Sw. kast.] 1. The act of casting or throwing; a throw. [1913 Webster] 2. The thing thrown. [1913 Webster] A cast of dreadful dust. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] 3. The distance to which a thing is or can be thrown. ``About a stone's cast.'' --Luke xxii. 41. [1913 Webster] 4. A throw of dice; hence, a chance or venture. [1913 Webster] An even cast whether the army should march this way or that way. --Sowth. [1913 Webster] I have set my life upon a cast, And I will stand the hazard of the die. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 5. That which is throw out or off, shed, or ejected; as, the skin of an insect, the refuse from a hawk's stomach, the excrement of a earthworm. [1913 Webster] 6. The act of casting in a mold. [1913 Webster] And why such daily cast of brazen cannon. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 7. An impression or mold, taken from a thing or person; amold; a pattern. [1913 Webster] 8. That which is formed in a mild; esp. a reproduction or copy, as of a work of art, in bronze or plaster, etc.; a casting. [1913 Webster] 9. Form; appearence; mien; air; style; as, a peculiar cast of countenance. ``A neat cast of verse.'' --Pope. [1913 Webster] An heroic poem, but in another cast and figure. --Prior. [1913 Webster] And thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 10. A tendency to any color; a tinge; a shade. [1913 Webster] Gray with a cast of green. --Woodward. [1913 Webster] 11. A chance, opportunity, privilege, or advantage; specifically, an opportunity of riding; a lift. [Scotch] [1913 Webster] We bargained with the driver to give us a cast to the next stage. --Smollett. [1913 Webster] If we had the cast o' a cart to bring it. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] 12. The assignment of parts in a play to the actors. [1913 Webster] 13. (Falconary) A flight or a couple or set of hawks let go at one time from the hand. --Grabb. [1913 Webster] As when a cast of falcons make their flight. --Spenser. [1913 Webster] 14. A stoke, touch, or trick. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] This was a cast of Wood's politics; for his information was wholly false. --Swift. [1913 Webster] 15. A motion or turn, as of the eye; direction; look; glance; squint. [1913 Webster] The cast of the eye is a gesture of aversion. --Bacon. [1913 Webster] And let you see with one cast of an eye. --Addison. [1913 Webster] This freakish, elvish cast came into the child's eye. --Hawthorne. [1913 Webster] 16. A tube or funnel for conveying metal into a mold. [1913 Webster] 17. Four; that is, as many as are thrown into a vessel at once in counting herrings, etc; a warp. [1913 Webster] 18. Contrivance; plot, design. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] {A cast of the eye}, a slight squint or strabismus. {Renal cast} (Med.), microscopic bodies found in the urine of persons affected with disease of the kidneys; -- so called because they are formed of matter deposited in, and preserving the outline of, the renal tubes. {The last cast}, the last throw of the dice or last effort, on which every thing is ventured; the last chance. [1913 Webster]
A Chamaepitys
ground \ground\ (ground), n. [OE. ground, grund, AS. grund; akin to D. grond, OS., G., Sw., & Dan. grund, Icel. grunnr bottom, Goth. grundus (in composition); perh. orig. meaning, dust, gravel, and if so perh. akin to E. grind.] 1. The surface of the earth; the outer crust of the globe, or some indefinite portion of it. [1913 Webster] There was not a man to till the ground. --Gen. ii. 5. [1913 Webster] The fire ran along upon the ground. --Ex. ix. 23. Hence: A floor or pavement supposed to rest upon the earth. [1913 Webster] 2. Any definite portion of the earth's surface; region; territory; country. Hence: A territory appropriated to, or resorted to, for a particular purpose; the field or place of action; as, a hunting or fishing ground; a play ground. [1913 Webster] From . . . old Euphrates, to the brook that parts Egypt from Syrian ground. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 3. Land; estate; possession; field; esp. (pl.), the gardens, lawns, fields, etc., belonging to a homestead; as, the grounds of the estate are well kept. [1913 Webster] Thy next design is on thy neighbor's grounds. --Dryden. 4. [1913 Webster] 4. The basis on which anything rests; foundation. Hence: The foundation of knowledge, belief, or conviction; a premise, reason, or datum; ultimate or first principle; cause of existence or occurrence; originating force or agency; as, the ground of my hope. [1913 Webster] 5. (Paint. & Decorative Art) (a) That surface upon which the figures of a composition are set, and which relieves them by its plainness, being either of one tint or of tints but slightly contrasted with one another; as, crimson Bowers on a white ground. See {Background}, {Foreground}, and {Middle-ground}. (b) In sculpture, a flat surface upon which figures are raised in relief. (c) In point lace, the net of small meshes upon which the embroidered pattern is applied; as, Brussels ground. See {Brussels lace}, under {Brussels}. [1913 Webster] 6. (Etching) A gummy composition spread over the surface of a metal to be etched, to prevent the acid from eating except where an opening is made by the needle. [1913 Webster] 7. (Arch.) One of the pieces of wood, flush with the plastering, to which moldings, etc., are attached; -- usually in the plural. [1913 Webster] Note: Grounds are usually put up first and the plastering floated flush with them. [1913 Webster] 8. (Mus.) (a) A composition in which the bass, consisting of a few bars of independent notes, is continually repeated to a varying melody. (b) The tune on which descants are raised; the plain song. --Moore (Encyc.). [1913 Webster] On that ground I'll build a holy descant. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 9. (Elec.) A conducting connection with the earth, whereby the earth is made part of an electrical circuit. [1913 Webster] 10. pl. Sediment at the bottom of liquors or liquids; dregs; lees; feces; as, coffee grounds. [1913 Webster] 11. The pit of a theater. [Obs.] --B. Jonson. [1913 Webster] {Ground angling}, angling with a weighted line without a float. {Ground annual} (Scots Law), an estate created in land by a vassal who instead of selling his land outright reserves an annual ground rent, which becomes a perpetual charge upon the land. {Ground ash}. (Bot.) See {Groutweed}. {Ground bailiff} (Mining), a superintendent of mines. --Simmonds. {Ground bait}, bits of bread, boiled barley or worms, etc., thrown into the water to collect the fish, --Wallon. {Ground bass} or {Ground base} (Mus.), fundamental base; a fundamental base continually repeated to a varied melody. {Ground beetle} (Zo["o]l.), one of numerous species of carnivorous beetles of the family {Carabid[ae]}, living mostly in burrows or under stones, etc. {Ground chamber}, a room on the ground floor. {Ground cherry}. (Bot.) (a) A genus ({Physalis}) of herbaceous plants having an inflated calyx for a seed pod: esp., the strawberry tomato ({Physalis Alkekengi}). See {Alkekengl}. (b) A European shrub ({Prunus Cham[ae]cerasus}), with small, very acid fruit. {Ground cuckoo}. (Zo["o]l.) See {Chaparral cock}. {Ground cypress}. (Bot.) See {Lavender cotton}. {Ground dove} (Zo["o]l.), one of several small American pigeons of the genus {Columbigallina}, esp. {C. passerina} of the Southern United States, Mexico, etc. They live chiefly on the ground. {Ground fish} (Zo["o]l.), any fish which constantly lives on the botton of the sea, as the sole, turbot, halibut. {Ground floor}, the floor of a house most nearly on a level with the ground; -- called also in America, but not in England, the {first floor}. {Ground form} (Gram.), the stem or basis of a word, to which the other parts are added in declension or conjugation. It is sometimes, but not always, the same as the root. {Ground furze} (Bot.), a low slightly thorny, leguminous shrub ({Ononis arvensis}) of Europe and Central Asia,; -- called also {rest-harrow}. {Ground game}, hares, rabbits, etc., as distinguished from winged game. {Ground hele} (Bot.), a perennial herb ({Veronica officinalis}) with small blue flowers, common in Europe and America, formerly thought to have curative properties. {Ground of the heavens} (Astron.), the surface of any part of the celestial sphere upon which the stars may be regarded as projected. {Ground hemlock} (Bot.), the yew ({Taxus baccata} var. Canadensisi) of eastern North America, distinguished from that of Europe by its low, straggling stems. {Ground hog}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The woodchuck or American marmot ({Arctomys monax}). See {Woodchuck}. (b) The aardvark. {Ground hold} (Naut.), ground tackle. [Obs.] --Spenser. {Ground ice}, ice formed at the bottom of a body of water before it forms on the surface. {Ground ivy}. (Bot.) A trailing plant; alehoof. See {Gill}. {Ground joist}, a joist for a basement or ground floor; a. sleeper. {Ground lark} (Zo["o]l.), the European pipit. See {Pipit}. {Ground laurel} (Bot.). See {Trailing arbutus}, under {Arbutus}. {Ground line} (Descriptive Geom.), the line of intersection of the horizontal and vertical planes of projection. {Ground liverwort} (Bot.), a flowerless plant with a broad flat forking thallus and the fruit raised on peduncled and radiated receptacles ({Marchantia polymorpha}). {Ground mail}, in Scotland, the fee paid for interment in a churchyard. {Ground mass} (Geol.), the fine-grained or glassy base of a rock, in which distinct crystals of its constituents are embedded. {Ground parrakeet} (Zo["o]l.), one of several Australian parrakeets, of the genera {Callipsittacus} and {Geopsittacus}, which live mainly upon the ground. {Ground pearl} (Zo["o]l.), an insect of the family {Coccid[ae]} ({Margarodes formicarum}), found in ants' nests in the Bahamas, and having a shelly covering. They are strung like beads, and made into necklaces by the natives. {Ground pig} (Zo["o]l.), a large, burrowing, African rodent ({Aulacodus Swinderianus}) about two feet long, allied to the porcupines but with harsh, bristly hair, and no spines; -- called also {ground rat}. {Ground pigeon} (Zo["o]l.), one of numerous species of pigeons which live largely upon the ground, as the tooth-billed pigeon ({Didunculus strigirostris}), of the Samoan Islands, and the crowned pigeon, or goura. See {Goura}, and {Ground dove} (above). {Ground pine}. (Bot.) (a) A blue-flowered herb of the genus {Ajuga} ({A. Cham[ae]pitys}), formerly included in the genus {Teucrium} or germander, and named from its resinous smell. --Sir J. Hill. (b) A long, creeping, evergreen plant of the genus {Lycopodium} ({L. clavatum}); -- called also {club moss}. (c) A tree-shaped evergreen plant about eight inches in height, of the same genus ({L. dendroideum}) found in moist, dark woods in the northern part of the United States. --Gray. {Ground plan} (Arch.), a plan of the ground floor of any building, or of any floor, as distinguished from an elevation or perpendicular section. {Ground plane}, the horizontal plane of projection in perspective drawing. {Ground plate}. (a) (Arch.) One of the chief pieces of framing of a building; a timber laid horizontally on or near the ground to support the uprights; a ground sill or groundsel. (b) (Railroads) A bed plate for sleepers or ties; a mudsill. (c) (Teleg.) A metallic plate buried in the earth to conduct the electric current thereto. Connection to the pipes of a gas or water main is usual in cities. --Knight. {Ground plot}, the ground upon which any structure is erected; hence, any basis or foundation; also, a ground plan. {Ground plum} (Bot.), a leguminous plant ({Astragalus caryocarpus}) occurring from the Saskatchewan to Texas, and having a succulent plum-shaped pod. {Ground rat}. (Zo["o]l.) See {Ground pig} (above). {Ground rent}, rent paid for the privilege of building on another man's land. {Ground robin}. (Zo["o]l.) See {Chewink}. {Ground room}, a room on the ground floor; a lower room. --Tatler. {Ground sea}, the West Indian name for a swell of the ocean, which occurs in calm weather and without obvious cause, breaking on the shore in heavy roaring billows; -- called also {rollers}, and in Jamaica, {the North sea}. {Ground sill}. See {Ground plate} (a) (above). {Ground snake} (Zo["o]l.), a small burrowing American snake ({Celuta am[oe]na}). It is salmon colored, and has a blunt tail. {Ground squirrel}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) One of numerous species of burrowing rodents of the genera {Tamias} and {Spermophilus}, having cheek pouches. The former genus includes the Eastern striped squirrel or chipmunk and some allied Western species; the latter includes the prairie squirrel or striped gopher, the gray gopher, and many allied Western species. See {Chipmunk}, and {Gopher}. (b) Any species of the African genus {Xerus}, allied to {Tamias}. {Ground story}. Same as {Ground floor} (above). {Ground substance} (Anat.), the intercellular substance, or matrix, of tissues. {Ground swell}. (a) (Bot.) The plant groundsel. [Obs.] --Holland. (b) A broad, deep swell or undulation of the ocean, caused by a long continued gale, and felt even at a remote distance after the gale has ceased. {Ground table}. (Arch.) See Earth table, under Earth. {Ground tackle} (Naut.), the tackle necessary to secure a vessel at anchor. --Totten. {Ground thrush} (Zo["o]l.), one of numerous species of bright-colored Oriental birds of the family {Pittid[ae]}. See {Pitta}. {Ground tier}. (a) The lowest tier of water casks in a vessel's hold. --Totten. (b) The lowest line of articles of any kind stowed in a vessel's hold. (c) The lowest range of boxes in a theater. {Ground timbers} (Shipbuilding) the timbers which lie on the keel and are bolted to the keelson; floor timbers. --Knight. {Ground tit}. (Zo["o]l.) See {Ground wren} (below). {Ground wheel}, that wheel of a harvester, mowing machine, etc., which, rolling on the ground, drives the mechanism. {Ground wren} (Zo["o]l.), a small California bird ({Cham[ae]a fasciata}) allied to the wrens and titmice. It inhabits the arid plains. Called also {ground tit}, and {wren tit}. {To bite the ground}, {To break ground}. See under {Bite}, {Break}. {To come to the ground}, {To fall to the ground}, to come to nothing; to fail; to miscarry. {To gain ground}. (a) To advance; to proceed forward in conflict; as, an army in battle gains ground. (b) To obtain an advantage; to have some success; as, the army gains ground on the enemy. (c) To gain credit; to become more prosperous or influential. {To get ground}, or {To gather ground}, to gain ground. [R.] ``Evening mist . . . gathers ground fast.'' --Milton. [1913 Webster] There is no way for duty to prevail, and get ground of them, but by bidding higher. --South. {To give ground}, to recede; to yield advantage. [1913 Webster] These nine . . . began to give me ground. --Shak. {To lose ground}, to retire; to retreat; to withdraw from the position taken; hence, to lose advantage; to lose credit or reputation; to decline. -- {To stand one's ground}, to stand firm; to resist attack or encroachment. --Atterbury.{To take the ground} to touch bottom or become stranded; -- said of a ship. [1913 Webster]
A cheval
A cheval \A` che*val"\ [F., lit., on horseback.] Astride; with a part on each side; -- used specif. in designating the position of an army with the wings separated by some line of demarcation, as a river or road. [1913 Webster] A position [`a] cheval on a river is not one which a general willingly assumes. --Swinton. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
A chip off the old block
Chip \Chip\, n. 1. A piece of wood, stone, or other substance, separated by an ax, chisel, or cutting instrument. [1913 Webster] 2. A fragment or piece broken off; a small piece. [1913 Webster] 3. Wood or Cuban palm leaf split into slips, or straw plaited in a special manner, for making hats or bonnets. [1913 Webster] 4. Anything dried up, withered, or without flavor; -- used contemptuously. [1913 Webster] 5. One of the counters used in poker and other games. [1913 Webster] 6. (Naut.) The triangular piece of wood attached to the log line. [1913 Webster] {Buffalo chips}. See under {Buffalo}. {Chip ax}, a small ax for chipping timber into shape. {Chip bonnet}, {Chip hat}, a bonnet or a hat made of Chip. See {Chip}, n., 3. {A chip off the old block}, a child who resembles either of his parents. [Colloq.] --Milton. {Potato chips}, {Saratoga chips}, thin slices of raw potato fried crisp. [1913 Webster]
A clean bill of health
Clean \Clean\ (kl[=e]n), a. [Compar. {Cleaner} (kl[=e]n"[~e]r); superl. {Cleanest}.] [OE. clene, AS. cl[=ae]ne; akin to OHG. chleini pure, neat, graceful, small, G. klein small, and perh. to W. glan clean, pure, bright; all perh. from a primitive, meaning bright, shining. Cf. {Glair}.] 1. Free from dirt or filth; as, clean clothes. [1913 Webster] 2. Free from that which is useless or injurious; without defects; as, clean land; clean timber. [1913 Webster] 3. Free from awkwardness; not bungling; adroit; dexterous; as, a clean trick; a clean leap over a fence. [1913 Webster] 4. Free from errors and vulgarisms; as, a clean style. [1913 Webster] 5. Free from restraint or neglect; complete; entire. [1913 Webster] When ye reap the harvest of your land, thou shalt not make clean riddance of corners of thy field. --Lev. xxiii. 22. [1913 Webster] 6. Free from moral defilement; sinless; pure. [1913 Webster] Create in me a clean heart, O God. --Ps. li. 10 [1913 Webster] That I am whole, and clean, and meet for Heaven --Tennyson. [1913 Webster] 7. (Script.) Free from ceremonial defilement. [1913 Webster] 8. Free from that which is corrupting to the morals; pure in tone; healthy. ``Lothair is clean.'' --F. Harrison. [1913 Webster] 9. Well-proportioned; shapely; as, clean limbs. [1913 Webster] {A clean bill of health}, a certificate from the proper authority that a ship is free from infection. {Clean breach}. See under {Breach}, n., 4. {To make a clean breast}. See under {Breast}. [1913 Webster]
A clean breach
Breach \Breach\ (br[=e]ch), n. [OE. breke, breche, AS. brice, gebrice, gebrece (in comp.), fr. brecan to break; akin to Dan. br[ae]k, MHG. breche, gap, breach. See {Break}, and cf. {Brake} (the instrument), {Brack} a break] . 1. The act of breaking, in a figurative sense. [1913 Webster] 2. Specifically: A breaking or infraction of a law, or of any obligation or tie; violation; non-fulfillment; as, a breach of contract; a breach of promise. [1913 Webster] 3. A gap or opening made made by breaking or battering, as in a wall or fortification; the space between the parts of a solid body rent by violence; a break; a rupture. [1913 Webster] Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more; Or close the wall up with our English dead. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 4. A breaking of waters, as over a vessel; the waters themselves; surge; surf. [1913 Webster] The Lord hath broken forth upon mine enemies before me, as the breach of waters. --2 Sam. v. 20. [1913 Webster] {A clear breach} implies that the waves roll over the vessel without breaking. {A clean breach} implies that everything on deck is swept away. --Ham. Nav. Encyc. [1913 Webster] 5. A breaking up of amicable relations; rupture. [1913 Webster] There's fallen between him and my lord An unkind breach. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 6. A bruise; a wound. [1913 Webster] Breach for breach, eye for eye. --Lev. xxiv. 20. [1913 Webster] 7. (Med.) A hernia; a rupture. [1913 Webster] 8. A breaking out upon; an assault. [1913 Webster] The Lord had made a breach upon Uzza. --1. Chron. xiii. 11. [1913 Webster] {Breach of falth}, a breaking, or a failure to keep, an expressed or implied promise; a betrayal of confidence or trust. {Breach of peace}, disorderly conduct, disturbing the public peace. {Breach of privilege}, an act or default in violation of the privilege or either house of Parliament, of Congress, or of a State legislature, as, for instance, by false swearing before a committee. --Mozley. Abbott. [1913 Webster] {Breach of promise}, violation of one's plighted word, esp. of a promise to marry. {Breach of trust}, violation of one's duty or faith in a matter entrusted to one. [1913 Webster] Syn: Rent; cleft; chasm; rift; aperture; gap; break; disruption; fracture; rupture; infraction; infringement; violation; quarrel; dispute; contention; difference; misunderstanding. [1913 Webster]
A clear breach
Breach \Breach\ (br[=e]ch), n. [OE. breke, breche, AS. brice, gebrice, gebrece (in comp.), fr. brecan to break; akin to Dan. br[ae]k, MHG. breche, gap, breach. See {Break}, and cf. {Brake} (the instrument), {Brack} a break] . 1. The act of breaking, in a figurative sense. [1913 Webster] 2. Specifically: A breaking or infraction of a law, or of any obligation or tie; violation; non-fulfillment; as, a breach of contract; a breach of promise. [1913 Webster] 3. A gap or opening made made by breaking or battering, as in a wall or fortification; the space between the parts of a solid body rent by violence; a break; a rupture. [1913 Webster] Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more; Or close the wall up with our English dead. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 4. A breaking of waters, as over a vessel; the waters themselves; surge; surf. [1913 Webster] The Lord hath broken forth upon mine enemies before me, as the breach of waters. --2 Sam. v. 20. [1913 Webster] {A clear breach} implies that the waves roll over the vessel without breaking. {A clean breach} implies that everything on deck is swept away. --Ham. Nav. Encyc. [1913 Webster] 5. A breaking up of amicable relations; rupture. [1913 Webster] There's fallen between him and my lord An unkind breach. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 6. A bruise; a wound. [1913 Webster] Breach for breach, eye for eye. --Lev. xxiv. 20. [1913 Webster] 7. (Med.) A hernia; a rupture. [1913 Webster] 8. A breaking out upon; an assault. [1913 Webster] The Lord had made a breach upon Uzza. --1. Chron. xiii. 11. [1913 Webster] {Breach of falth}, a breaking, or a failure to keep, an expressed or implied promise; a betrayal of confidence or trust. {Breach of peace}, disorderly conduct, disturbing the public peace. {Breach of privilege}, an act or default in violation of the privilege or either house of Parliament, of Congress, or of a State legislature, as, for instance, by false swearing before a committee. --Mozley. Abbott. [1913 Webster] {Breach of promise}, violation of one's plighted word, esp. of a promise to marry. {Breach of trust}, violation of one's duty or faith in a matter entrusted to one. [1913 Webster] Syn: Rent; cleft; chasm; rift; aperture; gap; break; disruption; fracture; rupture; infraction; infringement; violation; quarrel; dispute; contention; difference; misunderstanding. [1913 Webster]
A clerical error
Clerical \Cler"ic*al\, a. [LL. clericalis. See {Clerk}.] 1. Of or pertaining to the clergy; suitable for the clergy. ``A clerical education.'' --Burke. [1913 Webster] 2. Of or relating to a clerk or copyist, or to writing. ``Clerical work.'' --E. Everett. [1913 Webster] 3. characteristic of the work performed by a clerk, secretary, or copyist, or suitable to be performed by a clerk. ``Clerical staff.'' [PJC] {A clerical error}, an error made in copying or writing. [1913 Webster]
A closed sea
Close \Close\ (kl[=o]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Closed} (kl[=o]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Closing}.] [From OF. & F. clos, p. p. of clore to close, fr. L. claudere; akin to G. schliessen to shut, and to E. clot, cloister, clavicle, conclude, sluice. Cf. {Clause}, n.] 1. To stop, or fill up, as an opening; to shut; as, to close the eyes; to close a door. [1913 Webster] 2. To bring together the parts of; to consolidate; as, to close the ranks of an army; -- often used with up. [1913 Webster] 3. To bring to an end or period; to conclude; to complete; to finish; to end; to consummate; as, to close a bargain; to close a course of instruction. [1913 Webster] One frugal supper did our studies close. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] 4. To come or gather around; to inclose; to encompass; to confine. [1913 Webster] The depth closed me round about. --Jonah ii. 5. [1913 Webster] But now thou dost thyself immure and close In some one corner of a feeble heart. --Herbert. [1913 Webster] {A closed sea}, a sea within the jurisdiction of some particular nation, which controls its navigation. [1913 Webster]
A collaris
Scaup \Scaup\ (sk[add]p), n. [See {Scalp} a bed of oysters or mussels.] 1. A bed or stratum of shellfish; scalp. [Scot.] [1913 Webster] 2. (Zo["o]l.) A scaup duck. See below. [1913 Webster] {Scaup duck} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of northern ducks of the genus {Aythya}, or {Fuligula}. The adult males are, in large part, black. The three North American species are: the greater scaup duck ({Aythya marila}, var. nearctica), called also {broadbill}, {bluebill}, {blackhead}, {flock duck}, {flocking fowl}, and {raft duck}; the lesser scaup duck ({A. affinis}), called also {little bluebill}, {river broadbill}, and {shuffler}; the tufted, or ring-necked, scaup duck ({A. collaris}), called also {black jack}, {ringneck}, {ringbill}, {ringbill shuffler}, etc. See Illust. of {Ring-necked duck}, under {Ring-necked}. The common European scaup, or mussel, duck ({A. marila}), closely resembles the American variety. [1913 Webster]
a concatenation
Cascade system \Cascade system\ (Elec.) A system or method of connecting and operating two induction motors so that the primary circuit of one is connected to the secondary circuit of the other, the primary circuit of the latter being connected to the source of supply; also, a system of electric traction in which motors so connected are employed. The cascade system is also called {tandem system}, or {concatenated system}; the connection a {cascade connection}, {tandem connection}, or {concatenated connection}, or {a concatenation}; and the control of the motors so obtained a {tandem control}, or {concatenation control}. Note: In the cascade system of traction the cascade connection is used for starting and for low speeds up to half speed. For full speed the short-circuited motor is cut loose from the other motor and is either left idle or (commonly) connected direct to the line. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] ||
a conterbore
Countersink \Coun"ter*sink`\, n. 1. An enlargement of the upper part of a hole, forming a cavity or depression for receiving the head of a screw or bolt. [1913 Webster] Note: In the United States a flaring cavity formed by chamfering the edges of a round hole is called a countersink, while a cylindrical flat-bottomed enlargement of the mouth of the hole is usually called {a conterbore}. [1913 Webster] 2. A drill or cutting tool for countersinking holes. [1913 Webster]
A cut in rates
Cut \Cut\, n. 1. An opening made with an edged instrument; a cleft; a gash; a slash; a wound made by cutting; as, a sword cut. [1913 Webster] 2. A stroke or blow or cutting motion with an edged instrument; a stroke or blow with a whip. [1913 Webster] 3. That which wounds the feelings, as a harsh remark or criticism, or a sarcasm; personal discourtesy, as neglecting to recognize an acquaintance when meeting him; a slight. [1913 Webster] Rip called him by name, but the cur snarled, snapped his teeth, and passed on. This was an unkind cut indeed. --W. Irving. [1913 Webster] 4. A notch, passage, or channel made by cutting or digging; a furrow; a groove; as, a cut for a railroad. [1913 Webster] This great cut or ditch Secostris . . . purposed to have made a great deal wider and deeper. --Knolles. [1913 Webster] 5. The surface left by a cut; as, a smooth or clear cut. [1913 Webster] 6. A portion severed or cut off; a division; as, a cut of beef; a cut of timber. [1913 Webster] It should be understood, moreover, . . . that the group are not arbitrary cuts, but natural groups or types. --Dana. [1913 Webster] 7. An engraved block or plate; the impression from such an engraving; as, a book illustrated with fine cuts. [1913 Webster] 8. (a) The act of dividing a pack cards. (b) The right to divide; as, whose cut is it? [1913 Webster] 9. Manner in which a thing is cut or formed; shape; style; fashion; as, the cut of a garment. [1913 Webster] With eyes severe and beard of formal cut. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 10. A common work horse; a gelding. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] He'll buy me a cut, forth for to ride. --Beau. & Fl. [1913 Webster] 11. The failure of a college officer or student to be present at any appointed exercise. [College Cant] [1913 Webster] 12. A skein of yarn. --Wright. [1913 Webster] 13. (Lawn Tennis, etc.) A slanting stroke causing the ball to spin and bound irregularly; also, the spin so given to the ball. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] 14. (Cricket) A stroke on the off side between point and the wicket; also, one who plays this stroke. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] {A cut in rates} (Railroad), a reduction in fare, freight charges, etc., below the established rates. {A short cut}, a cross route which shortens the way and cuts off a circuitous passage. {The cut of one's jib}, the general appearance of a person. [Colloq.] {To draw cuts}, to draw lots, as of paper, etc., cut unequal lengths. [1913 Webster] Now draweth cut . . . The which that hath the shortest shall begin. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]
A dark horse
Dark \Dark\ (d[aum]rk), a. [OE. dark, derk, deork, AS. dearc, deorc; cf. Gael. & Ir. dorch, dorcha, dark, black, dusky.] 1. Destitute, or partially destitute, of light; not receiving, reflecting, or radiating light; wholly or partially black, or of some deep shade of color; not light-colored; as, a dark room; a dark day; dark cloth; dark paint; a dark complexion. [1913 Webster] O dark, dark, dark, amid the blaze of noon, Irrecoverably dark, total eclipse Without all hope of day! --Milton. [1913 Webster] In the dark and silent grave. --Sir W. Raleigh. [1913 Webster] 2. Not clear to the understanding; not easily seen through; obscure; mysterious; hidden. [1913 Webster] The dark problems of existence. --Shairp. [1913 Webster] What may seem dark at the first, will afterward be found more plain. --Hooker. [1913 Webster] What's your dark meaning, mouse, of this light word? --Shak. [1913 Webster] 3. Destitute of knowledge and culture; in moral or intellectual darkness; unrefined; ignorant. [1913 Webster] The age wherein he lived was dark, but he Could not want light who taught the world to see. --Denhan. [1913 Webster] The tenth century used to be reckoned by medi[ae]val historians as the darkest part of this intellectual night. --Hallam. [1913 Webster] 4. Evincing black or foul traits of character; vile; wicked; atrocious; as, a dark villain; a dark deed. [1913 Webster] Left him at large to his own dark designs. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 5. Foreboding evil; gloomy; jealous; suspicious. [1913 Webster] More dark and dark our woes. --Shak. [1913 Webster] A deep melancholy took possesion of him, and gave a dark tinge to all his views of human nature. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster] There is, in every true woman-s heart, a spark of heavenly fire, which beams and blazes in the dark hour of adversity. --W. Irving. [1913 Webster] 6. Deprived of sight; blind. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] He was, I think, at this time quite dark, and so had been for some years. --Evelyn. [1913 Webster] Note: Dark is sometimes used to qualify another adjective; as, dark blue, dark green, and sometimes it forms the first part of a compound; as, dark-haired, dark-eyed, dark-colored, dark-seated, dark-working. [1913 Webster] {A dark horse}, in racing or politics, a horse or a candidate whose chances of success are not known, and whose capabilities have not been made the subject of general comment or of wagers. [Colloq.] {Dark house}, {Dark room}, a house or room in which madmen were confined. [Obs.] --Shak. {Dark lantern}. See {Lantern}. -- The {Dark Ages}, a period of stagnation and obscurity in literature and art, lasting, according to Hallam, nearly 1000 years, from about 500 to about 1500 A. D.. See {Middle Ages}, under {Middle}. {The Dark and Bloody Ground}, a phrase applied to the State of Kentucky, and said to be the significance of its name, in allusion to the frequent wars that were waged there between Indians. {The dark day}, a day (May 19, 1780) when a remarkable and unexplained darkness extended over all New England. {To keep dark}, to reveal nothing. [Low] [1913 Webster]
A dead dog
Dog \Dog\ (d[o^]g), n. [AS. docga; akin to D. dog mastiff, Dan. dogge, Sw. dogg.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A quadruped of the genus {Canis}, esp. the domestic dog ({Canis familiaris}). Note: The dog is distinguished above all others of the inferior animals for intelligence, docility, and attachment to man. There are numerous carefully bred varieties, as the {akita}, {beagle}, {bloodhound}, {bulldog}, {coachdog}, {collie}, {Danish dog}, {foxhound}, {greyhound}, {mastiff}, {pointer}, {poodle}, {St. Bernard}, {setter}, {spaniel}, {spitz dog}, {terrier}, {German shepherd}, {pit bull}, {Chihuahua}, etc. There are also many mixed breeds, and partially domesticated varieties, as well as wild dogs, like the dingo and dhole. (See these names in the Vocabulary.) [1913 Webster +PJC] 2. A mean, worthless fellow; a wretch. [1913 Webster] What is thy servant, which is but a dog, that he should do this great thing? -- 2 Kings viii. 13 (Rev. Ver. ) [1913 Webster] 3. A fellow; -- used humorously or contemptuously; as, a sly dog; a lazy dog. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] 4. (Astron.) One of the two constellations, Canis Major and Canis Minor, or the Greater Dog and the Lesser Dog. Canis Major contains the Dog Star (Sirius). [1913 Webster] 5. An iron for holding wood in a fireplace; a firedog; an andiron. [1913 Webster] 6. (Mech.) (a) A grappling iron, with a claw or claws, for fastening into wood or other heavy articles, for the purpose of raising or moving them. (b) An iron with fangs fastening a log in a saw pit, or on the carriage of a sawmill. (c) A piece in machinery acting as a catch or clutch; especially, the carrier of a lathe, also, an adjustable stop to change motion, as in a machine tool. [1913 Webster] 7. an ugly or crude person, especially an ugly woman. [slang] [PJC] 8. a {hot dog}. [slang] [PJC] Note: Dog is used adjectively or in composition, commonly in the sense of relating to, or characteristic of, a dog. It is also used to denote a male; as, dog fox or g-fox, a male fox; dog otter or dog-otter, dog wolf, etc.; -- also to denote a thing of cheap or mean quality; as, dog Latin. [1913 Webster] {A dead dog}, a thing of no use or value. --1 Sam. xxiv. 14. {A dog in the manger}, an ugly-natured person who prevents others from enjoying what would be an advantage to them but is none to him. {Dog ape} (Zo["o]l.), a male ape. {Dog cabbage}, or {Dog's cabbage} (Bot.), a succulent herb, native to the Mediterranean region ({Thelygonum Cynocrambe}). {Dog cheap}, very cheap. See under {Cheap}. {Dog ear} (Arch.), an acroterium. [Colloq.] {Dog flea} (Zo["o]l.), a species of flea ({Pulex canis}) which infests dogs and cats, and is often troublesome to man. In America it is the common flea. See {Flea}, and {Aphaniptera}. {Dog grass} (Bot.), a grass ({Triticum caninum}) of the same genus as wheat. {Dog Latin}, barbarous Latin; as, the dog Latin of pharmacy. {Dog lichen} (Bot.), a kind of lichen ({Peltigera canina}) growing on earth, rocks, and tree trunks, -- a lobed expansion, dingy green above and whitish with fuscous veins beneath. {Dog louse} (Zo["o]l.), a louse that infests the dog, esp. {H[ae]matopinus piliferus}; another species is {Trichodectes latus}. {Dog power}, a machine operated by the weight of a dog traveling in a drum, or on an endless track, as for churning. {Dog salmon} (Zo["o]l.), a salmon of northwest America and northern Asia; -- the {gorbuscha}; -- called also {holia}, and {hone}. {Dog shark}. (Zo["o]l.) See {Dogfish}. {Dog's meat}, meat fit only for dogs; refuse; offal. {Dog Star}. See in the Vocabulary. {Dog wheat} (Bot.), Dog grass. {Dog whelk} (Zo["o]l.), any species of univalve shells of the family {Nassid[ae]}, esp. the {Nassa reticulata} of England. {To give to the dogs}, or {To throw to the dogs}, to throw away as useless. ``Throw physic to the dogs; I'll none of it.'' --Shak. {To go to the dogs}, to go to ruin; to be ruined. [1913 Webster]
A deep line of operations
Deep \Deep\ (d[=e]p), a. [Compar. {Deeper} (d[=e]p"[~e]r); superl. {Deepest} (d[=e]p"[e^]st).] [OE. dep, deop, AS. de['o]p; akin to D. diep, G. tief, Icel. dj[=u]pr, Sw. diup, Dan. dyb, Goth. diups; fr. the root of E. dip, dive. See {Dip}, {Dive}.] 1. Extending far below the surface; of great perpendicular dimension (measured from the surface downward, and distinguished from high, which is measured upward); far to the bottom; having a certain depth; as, a deep sea. [1913 Webster] The water where the brook is deep. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. Extending far back from the front or outer part; of great horizontal dimension (measured backward from the front or nearer part, mouth, etc.); as, a deep cave or recess or wound; a gallery ten seats deep; a company of soldiers six files deep. [1913 Webster] Shadowing squadrons deep. --Milton. [1913 Webster] Safely in harbor Is the king's ship in the deep nook. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 3. Low in situation; lying far below the general surface; as, a deep valley. [1913 Webster] 4. Hard to penetrate or comprehend; profound; -- opposed to {shallow} or {superficial}; intricate; mysterious; not obvious; obscure; as, a deep subject or plot. [1913 Webster] Speculations high or deep. --Milton. [1913 Webster] A question deep almost as the mystery of life. --De Quincey. [1913 Webster] O Lord, . . . thy thoughts are very deep. --Ps. xcii. 5. [1913 Webster] 5. Of penetrating or far-reaching intellect; not superficial; thoroughly skilled; sagacious; cunning. [1913 Webster] Deep clerks she dumbs. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 6. Profound; thorough; complete; unmixed; intense; heavy; heartfelt; as, deep distress; deep melancholy; deep horror. ``Deep despair.'' --Milton. ``Deep silence.'' --Milton. ``Deep sleep.'' --Gen. ii. 21. ``Deeper darkness.'' --Hoole. ``Their deep poverty.'' --2 Cor. viii. 2. [1913 Webster] An attitude of deep respect. --Motley. [1913 Webster] 7. Strongly colored; dark; intense; not light or thin; as, deep blue or crimson. [1913 Webster] 8. Of low tone; full-toned; not high or sharp; grave; heavy. ``The deep thunder.'' --Byron. [1913 Webster] The bass of heaven's deep organ. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 9. Muddy; boggy; sandy; -- said of roads. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] The ways in that vale were very deep. --Clarendon. [1913 Webster] {A deep line of operations} (Military), a long line. {Deep mourning} (Costume), mourning complete and strongly marked, the garments being not only all black, but also composed of lusterless materials and of such fashion as is identified with mourning garments. [1913 Webster]
A digitata
Sour \Sour\, a. [Compar. {Sourer}; superl. {Sourest}.] [OE. sour, sur, AS. s?r; akin to D. zuur, G. sauer, OHG. s?r, Icel. s?rr, Sw. sur, Dan. suur, Lith. suras salt, Russ. surovui harsh, rough. Cf. {Sorrel}, the plant.] 1. Having an acid or sharp, biting taste, like vinegar, and the juices of most unripe fruits; acid; tart. [1913 Webster] All sour things, as vinegar, provoke appetite. --Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2. Changed, as by keeping, so as to be acid, rancid, or musty, turned. [1913 Webster] 3. Disagreeable; unpleasant; hence; cross; crabbed; peevish; morose; as, a man of a sour temper; a sour reply. ``A sour countenance.'' --Swift. [1913 Webster] He was a scholar . . . Lofty and sour to them that loved him not, But to those men that sought him sweet as summer. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 4. Afflictive; painful. ``Sour adversity.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster] 5. Cold and unproductive; as, sour land; a sour marsh. [1913 Webster] {Sour dock} (Bot.), sorrel. {Sour gourd} (Bot.), the gourdlike fruit {Adansonia Gregorii}, and {A. digitata}; also, either of the trees bearing this fruit. See {Adansonia}. {Sour grapes}. See under {Grape}. {Sour gum} (Bot.) See {Turelo}. {Sour plum} (Bot.), the edible acid fruit of an Australian tree ({Owenia venosa}); also, the tree itself, which furnished a hard reddish wood used by wheelwrights. [1913 Webster] Syn: Acid; sharp; tart; acetous; acetose; harsh; acrimonious; crabbed; currish; peevish. [1913 Webster]
A direct induced current
Direct current \Direct current\ (Elec.) (a) A current flowing in one direction only; -- distinguished from {alternating current}. When steady and not pulsating a direct current is often called a {continuous current}. (b) {A direct induced current}, or momentary current of the same direction as the inducing current, produced by stopping or removing the latter; also, a similar current produced by removal of a magnet. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
A dog in the manger
Dog \Dog\ (d[o^]g), n. [AS. docga; akin to D. dog mastiff, Dan. dogge, Sw. dogg.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A quadruped of the genus {Canis}, esp. the domestic dog ({Canis familiaris}). Note: The dog is distinguished above all others of the inferior animals for intelligence, docility, and attachment to man. There are numerous carefully bred varieties, as the {akita}, {beagle}, {bloodhound}, {bulldog}, {coachdog}, {collie}, {Danish dog}, {foxhound}, {greyhound}, {mastiff}, {pointer}, {poodle}, {St. Bernard}, {setter}, {spaniel}, {spitz dog}, {terrier}, {German shepherd}, {pit bull}, {Chihuahua}, etc. There are also many mixed breeds, and partially domesticated varieties, as well as wild dogs, like the dingo and dhole. (See these names in the Vocabulary.) [1913 Webster +PJC] 2. A mean, worthless fellow; a wretch. [1913 Webster] What is thy servant, which is but a dog, that he should do this great thing? -- 2 Kings viii. 13 (Rev. Ver. ) [1913 Webster] 3. A fellow; -- used humorously or contemptuously; as, a sly dog; a lazy dog. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] 4. (Astron.) One of the two constellations, Canis Major and Canis Minor, or the Greater Dog and the Lesser Dog. Canis Major contains the Dog Star (Sirius). [1913 Webster] 5. An iron for holding wood in a fireplace; a firedog; an andiron. [1913 Webster] 6. (Mech.) (a) A grappling iron, with a claw or claws, for fastening into wood or other heavy articles, for the purpose of raising or moving them. (b) An iron with fangs fastening a log in a saw pit, or on the carriage of a sawmill. (c) A piece in machinery acting as a catch or clutch; especially, the carrier of a lathe, also, an adjustable stop to change motion, as in a machine tool. [1913 Webster] 7. an ugly or crude person, especially an ugly woman. [slang] [PJC] 8. a {hot dog}. [slang] [PJC] Note: Dog is used adjectively or in composition, commonly in the sense of relating to, or characteristic of, a dog. It is also used to denote a male; as, dog fox or g-fox, a male fox; dog otter or dog-otter, dog wolf, etc.; -- also to denote a thing of cheap or mean quality; as, dog Latin. [1913 Webster] {A dead dog}, a thing of no use or value. --1 Sam. xxiv. 14. {A dog in the manger}, an ugly-natured person who prevents others from enjoying what would be an advantage to them but is none to him. {Dog ape} (Zo["o]l.), a male ape. {Dog cabbage}, or {Dog's cabbage} (Bot.), a succulent herb, native to the Mediterranean region ({Thelygonum Cynocrambe}). {Dog cheap}, very cheap. See under {Cheap}. {Dog ear} (Arch.), an acroterium. [Colloq.] {Dog flea} (Zo["o]l.), a species of flea ({Pulex canis}) which infests dogs and cats, and is often troublesome to man. In America it is the common flea. See {Flea}, and {Aphaniptera}. {Dog grass} (Bot.), a grass ({Triticum caninum}) of the same genus as wheat. {Dog Latin}, barbarous Latin; as, the dog Latin of pharmacy. {Dog lichen} (Bot.), a kind of lichen ({Peltigera canina}) growing on earth, rocks, and tree trunks, -- a lobed expansion, dingy green above and whitish with fuscous veins beneath. {Dog louse} (Zo["o]l.), a louse that infests the dog, esp. {H[ae]matopinus piliferus}; another species is {Trichodectes latus}. {Dog power}, a machine operated by the weight of a dog traveling in a drum, or on an endless track, as for churning. {Dog salmon} (Zo["o]l.), a salmon of northwest America and northern Asia; -- the {gorbuscha}; -- called also {holia}, and {hone}. {Dog shark}. (Zo["o]l.) See {Dogfish}. {Dog's meat}, meat fit only for dogs; refuse; offal. {Dog Star}. See in the Vocabulary. {Dog wheat} (Bot.), Dog grass. {Dog whelk} (Zo["o]l.), any species of univalve shells of the family {Nassid[ae]}, esp. the {Nassa reticulata} of England. {To give to the dogs}, or {To throw to the dogs}, to throw away as useless. ``Throw physic to the dogs; I'll none of it.'' --Shak. {To go to the dogs}, to go to ruin; to be ruined. [1913 Webster]
A drawing of tea
Drawing \Draw"ing\, n. 1. The act of pulling, or attracting. [1913 Webster] 2. The act or the art of representing any object by means of lines and shades; especially, such a representation when in one color, or in tints used not to represent the colors of natural objects, but for effect only, and produced with hard material such as pencil, chalk, etc.; delineation; also, the figure or representation drawn. [1913 Webster] 3. The process of stretching or spreading metals as by hammering, or, as in forming wire from rods or tubes and cups from sheet metal, by pulling them through dies. [1913 Webster] 4. (Textile Manuf.) The process of pulling out and elongating the sliver from the carding machine, by revolving rollers, to prepare it for spinning. [1913 Webster] 5. The distribution of prizes and blanks in a lottery. [1913 Webster] Note: Drawing is used adjectively or as the first part of compounds in the sense of pertaining to drawing, for drawing (in the sense of pulling, and of pictorial representation); as, drawing master or drawing-master, drawing knife or drawing-knife, drawing machine, drawing board, drawing paper, drawing pen, drawing pencil, etc. [1913 Webster] {A drawing of tea}, a small portion of tea for steeping. {Drawing knife}. See in the {Vocabulary}. {Drawing paper} (Fine Arts), a thick, sized paper for draughtsman and for water-color painting. {Drawing slate}, a soft, slaty substance used in crayon drawing; -- called also {black chalk}, or {drawing chalk}. {Free-hand drawing}, a style of drawing made without the use of guiding or measuring instruments, as distinguished from mechanical or geometrical drawing; also, a drawing thus executed. [1913 Webster]
A F of L
A F of L \A. F. of L.\ (Abbrev.) American Federation of Labor. Syn: AFL. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
A far cry
Cry \Cry\ (kr?), n.; pl. {Cries} (kr?z). [F. cri, fr. crier to cry. See {Cry}, v. i. ] 1. A loud utterance; especially, the inarticulate sound produced by one of the lower animals; as, the cry of hounds; the cry of wolves. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. Outcry; clamor; tumult; popular demand. [1913 Webster] Again that cry was found to have been as unreasonable as ever. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster] 3. Any expression of grief, distress, etc., accompanied with tears or sobs; a loud sound, uttered in lamentation. [1913 Webster] There shall be a great cry throughout all the land. --Ex. xi. 6. [1913 Webster] An infant crying in the night, An infant crying for the light; And with no language but a cry. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster] 4. Loud expression of triumph or wonder or of popular acclamation or favor. --Swift. [1913 Webster] The cry went once on thee. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 5. Importunate supplication. [1913 Webster] O, the most piteous cry of the poor souls. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 6. Public advertisement by outcry; proclamation, as by hawkers of their wares. [1913 Webster] The street cries of London. --Mayhew. [1913 Webster] 7. Common report; fame. [1913 Webster] The cry goes that you shall marry her. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 8. A word or phrase caught up by a party or faction and repeated for effect; as, the party cry of the Tories. [1913 Webster] All now depends upon a good cry. --Beaconsfield. [1913 Webster] 9. A pack of hounds. --Milton. [1913 Webster] A cry more tunable Was never hollaed to, nor cheered with horn. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 10. A pack or company of persons; -- in contempt. [1913 Webster] Would not this . . . get me a fellowship in a cry of players? --Shak. [1913 Webster] 11. The crackling noise made by block tin when it is bent back and forth. [1913 Webster] {A far cry}, a long distance; -- in allusion to the sending of criers or messengers through the territory of a Scottish clan with an announcement or summons. [1913 Webster]
A feather in the cap
Feather \Feath"er\ (f[e^][th]"[~e]r), n. [OE. fether, AS. fe[eth]er; akin to D. veder, OHG. fedara, G. feder, Icel. fj["o][eth]r, Sw. fj["a]der, Dan. fj[ae]der, Gr. ptero`n wing, feather, pe`tesqai to fly, Skr. pattra wing, feather, pat to fly, and prob. to L. penna feather, wing. [root]76, 248. Cf. {Pen} a feather.] 1. One of the peculiar dermal appendages, of several kinds, belonging to birds, as contour feathers, quills, and down. [1913 Webster] Note: An ordinary feather consists of the quill or hollow basal part of the stem; the shaft or rachis, forming the upper, solid part of the stem; the vanes or webs, implanted on the rachis and consisting of a series of slender lamin[ae] or barbs, which usually bear barbules, which in turn usually bear barbicels and interlocking hooks by which they are fastened together. See {Down}, {Quill}, {Plumage}. 2. Kind; nature; species; -- from the proverbial phrase, ``Birds of a feather,'' that is, of the same species. [R.] [1913 Webster] I am not of that feather to shake off My friend when he must need me. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 3. The fringe of long hair on the legs of the setter and some other dogs. [1913 Webster] 4. A tuft of peculiar, long, frizzly hair on a horse. [1913 Webster] 5. One of the fins or wings on the shaft of an arrow. [1913 Webster] 6. (Mach. & Carp.) A longitudinal strip projecting as a fin from an object, to strengthen it, or to enter a channel in another object and thereby prevent displacement sidwise but permit motion lengthwise; a spline. [1913 Webster] 7. A thin wedge driven between the two semicylindrical parts of a divided plug in a hole bored in a stone, to rend the stone. --Knight. [1913 Webster] 8. The angular adjustment of an oar or paddle-wheel float, with reference to a horizontal axis, as it leaves or enters the water. [1913 Webster] Note: Feather is used adjectively or in combination, meaning composed of, or resembling, a feather or feathers; as, feather fan, feather-heeled, feather duster. [1913 Webster] {Feather alum} (Min.), a hydrous sulphate of alumina, resulting from volcanic action, and from the decomposition of iron pyrites; -- called also {halotrichite}. --Ure. {Feather bed}, a bed filled with feathers. {Feather driver}, one who prepares feathers by beating. {Feather duster}, a dusting brush of feathers. {Feather flower}, an artifical flower made of feathers, for ladies' headdresses, and other ornamental purposes. {Feather grass} (Bot.), a kind of grass ({Stipa pennata}) which has a long feathery awn rising from one of the chaffy scales which inclose the grain. {Feather maker}, one who makes plumes, etc., of feathers, real or artificial. {Feather ore} (Min.), a sulphide of antimony and lead, sometimes found in capillary forms and like a cobweb, but also massive. It is a variety of Jamesonite. {Feather shot}, or {Feathered shot} (Metal.), copper granulated by pouring into cold water. --Raymond. {Feather spray} (Naut.), the spray thrown up, like pairs of feathers, by the cutwater of a fast-moving vessel. {Feather star}. (Zo["o]l.) See {Comatula}. {Feather weight}. (Racing) (a) Scrupulously exact weight, so that a feather would turn the scale, when a jockey is weighed or weighted. (b) The lightest weight that can be put on the back of a horse in racing. --Youatt. (c) In wrestling, boxing, etc., a term applied to the lightest of the classes into which contestants are divided; -- in contradistinction to {light weight}, {middle weight}, and {heavy weight}. {A feather in the cap} an honour, trophy, or mark of distinction. [Colloq.] {To be in full feather}, to be in full dress or in one's best clothes. [Collog.] {To be in high feather}, to be in high spirits. [Collog.] {To cut a feather}. (a) (Naut.) To make the water foam in moving; in allusion to the ripple which a ship throws off from her bows. (b) To make one's self conspicuous. [Colloq.] {To show the white feather}, to betray cowardice, -- a white feather in the tail of a cock being considered an indication that he is not of the true game breed. [1913 Webster]
A few
Few \Few\ (f[=u]), a. [Compar. {Fewer} (f[=u]"[~e]r); superl. {Fewest}.] [OE. fewe, feawe, AS. fe['a], pl. fe['a]we; akin to OS. f[=a]h, OHG. f[=o] fao, Icel. f[=a]r, Sw. f[*a], pl., Dan. faa, pl., Goth. faus, L. paucus, cf. Gr. pay^ros. Cf. {Paucity}.] Not many; small, limited, or confined in number; -- indicating a small portion of units or individuals constituting a whole; often, by ellipsis of a noun, a few people. ``Are not my days few?'' --Job x. 20. [1913 Webster] Few know and fewer care. --Proverb. [1913 Webster] Note: Few is often used partitively; as, few of them. [1913 Webster] {A few}, a small number. {In few}, in a few words; briefly. --Shak. {No few}, not few; more than a few; many. --Cowper. {The few}, the minority; -- opposed to the many or the majority. [1913 Webster]
A fighting chance
Fighting \Fight"ing\, a. 1. Qualified for war; fit for battle. [1913 Webster] An host of fighting men. --2 Chron. xxvi. 11. [1913 Webster] 2. Occupied in war; being the scene of a battle; as, a fighting field. --Pope. [1913 Webster] {A fighting chance}, one dependent upon the issue of a struggle. [Colloq.] {Fighting crab} (Zo["o]l.), the fiddler crab. {Fighting fish} (Zo["o]l.), a remarkably pugnacious East Indian fish ({Betta pugnax}), reared by the Siamese for spectacular fish fights. [1913 Webster]
A flea in the ear
Flea \Flea\, n. [OE. fle, flee, AS. fle['a], fle['a]h; akin to D. vtoo, OHG. fl[=o]h, G. floh, Icel. fl[=o], Russ. blocha; prob. from the root of E. flee. [root]84. See {Flee}.] (Zo["o]l.) An insect belonging to the genus {Pulex}, of the order {Aphaniptera}. Fleas are destitute of wings, but have the power of leaping energetically. The bite is poisonous to most persons. The human flea ({Pulex irritans}), abundant in Europe, is rare in America, where the dog flea ({Ctenocephalides canis}, formerly {Pulex canis}) and the smaller cat flea ({Ctenocephalides felis}) take its place. See {Aphaniptera}, and {Dog flea}. See Illustration in Appendix. [1913 Webster] {A flea in the ear}, an unwelcome hint or unexpected reply, annoying like a flea; an irritating repulse; as, to put a flea in one's ear; to go away with a flea in one's ear. {Beach flea}, {Black flea}, etc. See under {Beach}, etc. [1913 Webster]
A fluviatilis
Stone \Stone\, n. [OE. ston, stan, AS. st[=a]n; akin to OS. & OFries. st[=e]n, D. steen, G. stein, Icel. steinn, Sw. sten, Dan. steen, Goth. stains, Russ. stiena a wall, Gr. ?, ?, a pebble. [root]167. Cf. {Steen}.] 1. Concreted earthy or mineral matter; also, any particular mass of such matter; as, a house built of stone; the boy threw a stone; pebbles are rounded stones. ``Dumb as a stone.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] They had brick for stone, and slime . . . for mortar. --Gen. xi. 3. [1913 Webster] Note: In popular language, very large masses of stone are called rocks; small masses are called stones; and the finer kinds, gravel, or sand, or grains of sand. Stone is much and widely used in the construction of buildings of all kinds, for walls, fences, piers, abutments, arches, monuments, sculpture, and the like. [1913 Webster] 2. A precious stone; a gem. ``Many a rich stone.'' --Chaucer. ``Inestimable stones, unvalued jewels.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster] 3. Something made of stone. Specifically: [1913 Webster] (a) The glass of a mirror; a mirror. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Lend me a looking-glass; If that her breath will mist or stain the stone, Why, then she lives. --Shak. [1913 Webster] (b) A monument to the dead; a gravestone. --Gray. [1913 Webster] Should some relenting eye Glance on the where our cold relics lie. --Pope. [1913 Webster] 4. (Med.) A calculous concretion, especially one in the kidneys or bladder; the disease arising from a calculus. [1913 Webster] 5. One of the testes; a testicle. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 6. (Bot.) The hard endocarp of drupes; as, the stone of a cherry or peach. See Illust. of {Endocarp}. [1913 Webster] 7. A weight which legally is fourteen pounds, but in practice varies with the article weighed. [Eng.] [1913 Webster] Note: The stone of butchers' meat or fish is reckoned at 8 lbs.; of cheese, 16 lbs.; of hemp, 32 lbs.; of glass, 5 lbs. [1913 Webster] 8. Fig.: Symbol of hardness and insensibility; torpidness; insensibility; as, a heart of stone. [1913 Webster] I have not yet forgot myself to stone. --Pope. [1913 Webster] 9. (Print.) A stand or table with a smooth, flat top of stone, commonly marble, on which to arrange the pages of a book, newspaper, etc., before printing; -- called also {imposing stone}. [1913 Webster] Note: Stone is used adjectively or in composition with other words to denote made of stone, containing a stone or stones, employed on stone, or, more generally, of or pertaining to stone or stones; as, stone fruit, or stone-fruit; stone-hammer, or stone hammer; stone falcon, or stone-falcon. Compounded with some adjectives it denotes a degree of the quality expressed by the adjective equal to that possessed by a stone; as, stone-dead, stone-blind, stone-cold, stone-still, etc. [1913 Webster] {Atlantic stone}, ivory. [Obs.] ``Citron tables, or Atlantic stone.'' --Milton. {Bowing stone}. Same as {Cromlech}. --Encyc. Brit. {Meteoric stones}, stones which fall from the atmosphere, as after the explosion of a meteor. {Philosopher's stone}. See under {Philosopher}. {Rocking stone}. See {Rocking-stone}. {Stone age}, a supposed prehistoric age of the world when stone and bone were habitually used as the materials for weapons and tools; -- called also {flint age}. The {bronze age} succeeded to this. {Stone bass} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of marine food fishes of the genus {Serranus} and allied genera, as {Serranus Couchii}, and {Polyprion cernium} of Europe; -- called also {sea perch}. {Stone biter} (Zo["o]l.), the wolf fish. {Stone boiling}, a method of boiling water or milk by dropping hot stones into it, -- in use among savages. --Tylor. {Stone borer} (Zo["o]l.), any animal that bores stones; especially, one of certain bivalve mollusks which burrow in limestone. See {Lithodomus}, and {Saxicava}. {Stone bramble} (Bot.), a European trailing species of bramble ({Rubus saxatilis}). {Stone-break}. [Cf. G. steinbrech.] (Bot.) Any plant of the genus {Saxifraga}; saxifrage. {Stone bruise}, a sore spot on the bottom of the foot, from a bruise by a stone. {Stone canal}. (Zo["o]l.) Same as {Sand canal}, under {Sand}. {Stone cat} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small fresh-water North American catfishes of the genus {Noturus}. They have sharp pectoral spines with which they inflict painful wounds. {Stone coal}, hard coal; mineral coal; anthracite coal. {Stone coral} (Zo["o]l.), any hard calcareous coral. {Stone crab}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A large crab ({Menippe mercenaria}) found on the southern coast of the United States and much used as food. (b) A European spider crab ({Lithodes maia}). {Stone crawfish} (Zo["o]l.), a European crawfish ({Astacus torrentium}), by many writers considered only a variety of the common species ({A. fluviatilis}). {Stone curlew}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A large plover found in Europe ({Edicnemus crepitans}). It frequents stony places. Called also {thick-kneed plover} or {bustard}, and {thick-knee}. (b) The whimbrel. [Prov. Eng.] (c) The willet. [Local, U.S.] {Stone crush}. Same as {Stone bruise}, above. {Stone eater}. (Zo["o]l.) Same as {Stone borer}, above. {Stone falcon} (Zo["o]l.), the merlin. {Stone fern} (Bot.), a European fern ({Asplenium Ceterach}) which grows on rocks and walls. {Stone fly} (Zo["o]l.), any one of many species of pseudoneuropterous insects of the genus {Perla} and allied genera; a perlid. They are often used by anglers for bait. The larv[ae] are aquatic. {Stone fruit} (Bot.), any fruit with a stony endocarp; a drupe, as a peach, plum, or cherry. {Stone grig} (Zo["o]l.), the mud lamprey, or pride. {Stone hammer}, a hammer formed with a face at one end, and a thick, blunt edge, parallel with the handle, at the other, -- used for breaking stone. {Stone hawk} (Zo["o]l.), the merlin; -- so called from its habit of sitting on bare stones. {Stone jar}, a jar made of stoneware. {Stone lily} (Paleon.), a fossil crinoid. {Stone lugger}. (Zo["o]l.) See {Stone roller}, below. {Stone marten} (Zo["o]l.), a European marten ({Mustela foina}) allied to the pine marten, but having a white throat; -- called also {beech marten}. {Stone mason}, a mason who works or builds in stone. {Stone-mortar} (Mil.), a kind of large mortar formerly used in sieges for throwing a mass of small stones short distances. {Stone oil}, rock oil, petroleum. {Stone parsley} (Bot.), an umbelliferous plant ({Seseli Labanotis}). See under {Parsley}. {Stone pine}. (Bot.) A nut pine. See the Note under {Pine}, and {Pi[~n]on}. {Stone pit}, a quarry where stones are dug. {Stone pitch}, hard, inspissated pitch. {Stone plover}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The European stone curlew. (b) Any one of several species of Asiatic plovers of the genus {Esacus}; as, the large stone plover ({E. recurvirostris}). (c) The gray or black-bellied plover. [Prov. Eng.] (d) The ringed plover. (e) The bar-tailed godwit. [Prov. Eng.] Also applied to other species of limicoline birds. {Stone roller}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) An American fresh-water fish ({Catostomus nigricans}) of the Sucker family. Its color is yellowish olive, often with dark blotches. Called also {stone lugger}, {stone toter}, {hog sucker}, {hog mullet}. (b) A common American cyprinoid fish ({Campostoma anomalum}); -- called also {stone lugger}. {Stone's cast}, or {Stone's throw}, the distance to which a stone may be thrown by the hand; as, they live a stone's throw from each other. {Stone snipe} (Zo["o]l.), the greater yellowlegs, or tattler. [Local, U.S.] {Stone toter}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) See {Stone roller} (a), above. (b) A cyprinoid fish ({Exoglossum maxillingua}) found in the rivers from Virginia to {New York}. It has a three-lobed lower lip; -- called also {cutlips}. {To leave no stone unturned}, to do everything that can be done; to use all practicable means to effect an object. [1913 Webster]
A forlorn hope
Forlorn \For*lorn"\, a. [OE., p. p. of forlesen to lose utterly, AS. forle['o]san (p. p. forloren); pref. for- + le['o]san (in comp.) to lose; cf. D. verliezen to lose, G. verlieren, Sw. f["o]rlora, Dan. forloren, Goth. fraliusan to lose. See {For-}, and {Lorn}, a., {Lose}, v. t.] 1. Deserted; abandoned; lost. [1913 Webster] Of fortune and of hope at once forlorn. --Spenser. [1913 Webster] Some say that ravens foster forlorn children. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. Destitute; helpless; in pitiful plight; wretched; miserable; almost hopeless; desperate. [1913 Webster] For here forlorn and lost I tread. --Goldsmith. [1913 Webster] The condition of the besieged in the mean time was forlorn in the extreme. --Prescott. [1913 Webster] She cherished the forlorn hope that he was still living. --Thomson. [1913 Webster] {A forlorn hope} [D. verloren hoop, prop., a lost band or troop; verloren, p. p. of verliezen to lose + hoop band; akin to E. heap. See {For-}, and {Heap}.] (Mil.), a body of men (called in F. {enfants perdus}, in G. {verlornen posten}) selected, usually from volunteers, to attempt a breach, scale the wall of a fortress, or perform other extraordinarily perilous service; also, a desperate case or enterprise. Syn: Destitute, lost; abandoned; forsaken; solitary; helpless; friendless; hopeless; abject; wretched; miserable; pitiable. [1913 Webster]
A fortiori
A fortiori \A for`ti*o"ri\ [L.] (Logic & Math.) With stronger reason. [1913 Webster]
A friend at court
Friend \Friend\ (fr[e^]nd), n. [OR. frend, freond, AS. fre['o]nd, prop. p. pr. of fre['o]n, fre['o]gan, to love; akin to D. vriend friend, OS. friund friend, friohan to love, OHG. friunt friend, G. freund, Icel. fr[ae]ndi kinsman, Sw. fr["a]nde. Goth. frij[=o]nds friend, frij[=o]n to love. [root]83. See {Free}, and cf. {Fiend}.] 1. One who entertains for another such sentiments of esteem, respect, and affection that he seeks his society and welfare; a wellwisher; an intimate associate; sometimes, an attendant. [1913 Webster] Want gives to know the flatterer from the friend. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] A friend that sticketh closer than a brother. --Prov. xviii. 24. [1913 Webster] 2. One not inimical or hostile; one not a foe or enemy; also, one of the same nation, party, kin, etc., whose friendly feelings may be assumed. The word is some times used as a term of friendly address. [1913 Webster] Friend, how camest thou in hither? --Matt. xxii. 12. [1913 Webster] 3. One who looks propitiously on a cause, an institution, a project, and the like; a favorer; a promoter; as, a friend to commerce, to poetry, to an institution. [1913 Webster] 4. One of a religious sect characterized by disuse of outward rites and an ordained ministry, by simplicity of dress and speech, and esp. by opposition to war and a desire to live at peace with all men. They are popularly called Quakers. [1913 Webster] America was first visited by Friends in 1656. --T. Chase. [1913 Webster] 5. A paramour of either sex. [Obs.] --Shak. [1913 Webster] {A friend at court} or {A friend in court}, one disposed to act as a friend in a place of special opportunity or influence. {To be friends with}, to have friendly relations with. ``He's . . . friends with C[ae]sar.'' --Shak. {To make friends with}, to become reconciled to or on friendly terms with. ``Having now made friends with the Athenians.'' --Jowett (Thucyd.). [1913 Webster]
A friend in court
Friend \Friend\ (fr[e^]nd), n. [OR. frend, freond, AS. fre['o]nd, prop. p. pr. of fre['o]n, fre['o]gan, to love; akin to D. vriend friend, OS. friund friend, friohan to love, OHG. friunt friend, G. freund, Icel. fr[ae]ndi kinsman, Sw. fr["a]nde. Goth. frij[=o]nds friend, frij[=o]n to love. [root]83. See {Free}, and cf. {Fiend}.] 1. One who entertains for another such sentiments of esteem, respect, and affection that he seeks his society and welfare; a wellwisher; an intimate associate; sometimes, an attendant. [1913 Webster] Want gives to know the flatterer from the friend. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] A friend that sticketh closer than a brother. --Prov. xviii. 24. [1913 Webster] 2. One not inimical or hostile; one not a foe or enemy; also, one of the same nation, party, kin, etc., whose friendly feelings may be assumed. The word is some times used as a term of friendly address. [1913 Webster] Friend, how camest thou in hither? --Matt. xxii. 12. [1913 Webster] 3. One who looks propitiously on a cause, an institution, a project, and the like; a favorer; a promoter; as, a friend to commerce, to poetry, to an institution. [1913 Webster] 4. One of a religious sect characterized by disuse of outward rites and an ordained ministry, by simplicity of dress and speech, and esp. by opposition to war and a desire to live at peace with all men. They are popularly called Quakers. [1913 Webster] America was first visited by Friends in 1656. --T. Chase. [1913 Webster] 5. A paramour of either sex. [Obs.] --Shak. [1913 Webster] {A friend at court} or {A friend in court}, one disposed to act as a friend in a place of special opportunity or influence. {To be friends with}, to have friendly relations with. ``He's . . . friends with C[ae]sar.'' --Shak. {To make friends with}, to become reconciled to or on friendly terms with. ``Having now made friends with the Athenians.'' --Jowett (Thucyd.). [1913 Webster]
a going business
Going \Go"ing\, p. pr. of {Go}. Specif.: (a) That goes; in existence; available for present use or enjoyment; current; obtainable; also, moving; working; in operation; departing; as, he is of the brightest men going; going prices or rate. (b) Carrying on its ordinary business; conducting business, or carried on, with an indefinite prospect of continuance; -- chiefly used in the phrases {a going business}, {concern}, etc. (c) Of or pertaining to a going business or concern; as, the going value of a company. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
A good landfall
Landfall \Land"fall\, n. 1. A sudden transference of property in land by the death of its owner. [1913 Webster] 2. (Naut.) Sighting or making land when at sea. [1913 Webster] {A good landfall} (Naut.), the sighting of land in conformity with the navigator's reckoning and expectation. [1913 Webster]
A good leg
Leg \Leg\ (l[e^]g), n. [Icel. leggr; akin to Dan. l[ae]g calf of the leg, Sw. l["a]gg.] 1. A limb or member of an animal used for supporting the body, and in running, climbing, and swimming; esp., that part of the limb between the knee and foot. [1913 Webster] 2. That which resembles a leg in form or use; especially, any long and slender support on which any object rests; as, the leg of a table; the leg of a pair of compasses or dividers. [1913 Webster] 3. The part of any article of clothing which covers the leg; as, the leg of a stocking or of a pair of trousers. [1913 Webster] 4. A bow, esp. in the phrase to make a leg; probably from drawing the leg backward in bowing. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] He that will give a cap and make a leg in thanks for a favor he never received. --Fuller. [1913 Webster] 5. A disreputable sporting character; a blackleg. [Slang, Eng.] [1913 Webster] 6. (Naut.) The course and distance made by a vessel on one tack or between tacks. [1913 Webster] 7. (Steam Boiler) An extension of the boiler downward, in the form of a narrow space between vertical plates, sometimes nearly surrounding the furnace and ash pit, and serving to support the boiler; -- called also {water leg}. [1913 Webster] 8. (Grain Elevator) The case containing the lower part of the belt which carries the buckets. [1913 Webster] 9. (Cricket) A fielder whose position is on the outside, a little in rear of the batter. [1913 Webster] 10. (Math.) Either side of a triangle distinguished from the base or, in a right triangle, from the hypotenuse; also, an indefinitely extending branch of a curve, as of a hyperbola. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] 11. (Telephony) A branch or lateral circuit connecting an instrument with the main line. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] 12. (Elec.) A branch circuit; one phase of a polyphase system. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] {A good leg} (Naut.), a course sailed on a tack which is near the desired course. {Leg bail}, escape from custody by flight. [Slang] {Legs of an hyperbola} (or other curve) (Geom.), the branches of the curve which extend outward indefinitely. {Legs of a triangle}, the sides of a triangle; -- a name seldom used unless one of the sides is first distinguished by some appropriate term; as, the hypothenuse and two legs of a right-angled triangle. {On one's legs}, standing to speak. {On one's last legs}. See under {Last}. {To have legs} (Naut.), to have speed. {To stand on one's own legs}, to support one's self; to be independent. [1913 Webster]
A grain of allowance
Grain \Grain\ (gr[=a]n), n. [F. grain, L. granum, grain, seed, small kernel, small particle. See {Corn}, and cf. {Garner}, n., {Garnet}, {Gram} the chick-pea, {Granule}, {Kernel.}] [1913 Webster] 1. A single small hard seed; a kernel, especially of those plants, like wheat, whose seeds are used for food. [1913 Webster] 2. The fruit of certain grasses which furnish the chief food of man, as corn, wheat, rye, oats, etc., or the plants themselves; -- used collectively. [1913 Webster] Storehouses crammed with grain. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 3. Any small, hard particle, as of sand, sugar, salt, etc.; hence, any minute portion or particle; as, a grain of gunpowder, of pollen, of starch, of sense, of wit, etc. [1913 Webster] I . . . with a grain of manhood well resolved. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 4. The unit of the English system of weights; -- so called because considered equal to the average of grains taken from the middle of the ears of wheat. 7,000 grains constitute the pound avoirdupois, and 5,760 grains the pound troy. A grain is equal to .0648 gram. See {Gram.} [1913 Webster] 5. A reddish dye made from the coccus insect, or kermes; hence, a red color of any tint or hue, as crimson, scarlet, etc.; sometimes used by the poets as equivalent to {Tyrian purple}. [1913 Webster] All in a robe of darkest grain. --Milton. [1913 Webster] Doing as the dyers do, who, having first dipped their silks in colors of less value, then give' them the last tincture of crimson in grain. --Quoted by Coleridge, preface to Aids to Reflection. [1913 Webster] 6. The composite particles of any substance; that arrangement of the particles of any body which determines its comparative roughness or hardness; texture; as, marble, sugar, sandstone, etc., of fine grain. [1913 Webster] Hard box, and linden of a softer grain. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] 7. The direction, arrangement, or appearance of the fibers in wood, or of the strata in stone, slate, etc. [1913 Webster] Knots, by the conflux of meeting sap, Infect the sound pine and divert his grain Tortive and errant from his course of growth. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 8. The fiber which forms the substance of wood or of any fibrous material. [1913 Webster] 9. The hair side of a piece of leather, or the marking on that side. --Knight. [1913 Webster] 10. pl. The remains of grain, etc., after brewing or distillation; hence, any residuum. Also called {draff}. [1913 Webster] 11. (Bot.) A rounded prominence on the back of a sepal, as in the common dock. See {Grained}, a., 4. [1913 Webster] 12. Temper; natural disposition; inclination. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Brothers . . . not united in grain. --Hayward. [1913 Webster] 13. A sort of spice, the grain of paradise. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] He cheweth grain and licorice, To smellen sweet. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] {Against the grain}, against or across the direction of the fibers; hence, against one's wishes or tastes; unwillingly; unpleasantly; reluctantly; with difficulty. --Swift. --Saintsbury. {A grain of allowance}, a slight indulgence or latitude a small allowance. {Grain binder}, an attachment to a harvester for binding the grain into sheaves. {Grain colors}, dyes made from the coccus or kermes insect. {Grain leather}. (a) Dressed horse hides. (b) Goat, seal, and other skins blacked on the grain side for women's shoes, etc. {Grain moth} (Zo["o]l.), one of several small moths, of the family {Tineid[ae]} (as {Tinea granella} and {Butalis cerealella}), whose larv[ae] devour grain in storehouses. {Grain side} (Leather), the side of a skin or hide from which the hair has been removed; -- opposed to {flesh side.} {Grains of paradise}, the seeds of a species of amomum. {grain tin}, crystalline tin ore metallic tin smelted with charcoal. {Grain weevil} (Zo["o]l.), a small red weevil ({Sitophilus granarius}), which destroys stored wheat and other grain, by eating out the interior. {Grain worm} (Zo["o]l.), the larva of the grain moth. See {grain moth}, above. {In grain}, of a fast color; deeply seated; fixed; innate; genuine. ``Anguish in grain.'' --Herbert. {To dye in grain}, to dye of a fast color by means of the coccus or kermes grain [see {Grain}, n., 5]; hence, to dye firmly; also, to dye in the wool, or in the raw material. See under {Dye.} [1913 Webster] The red roses flush up in her cheeks . . . Likce crimson dyed in grain. --Spenser. {To go against the grain of} (a person), to be repugnant to; to vex, irritate, mortify, or trouble. [1913 Webster]
A great gross
Gross \Gross\, n. [F. gros (in sense 1), grosse (in sense 2). See {Gross}, a.] 1. The main body; the chief part, bulk, or mass. ``The gross of the enemy.'' --Addison. [1913 Webster] For the gross of the people, they are considered as a mere herd of cattle. --Burke. [1913 Webster] 2. sing. & pl. The number of twelve dozen; twelve times twelve; as, a gross of bottles; ten gross of pens. [1913 Webster] {Advowson in gross} (Law), an advowson belonging to a person, and not to a manor. {A great gross}, twelve gross; one hundred and forty-four dozen. {By the gross}, by the quantity; at wholesale. {Common in gross}. (Law) See under {Common}, n. {In the gross}, {In gross}, in the bulk, or the undivided whole; all parts taken together. [1913 Webster]
A greegree man
Greegree \Gree"gree`\, Grigri \Gri"gri`\, n. An African talisman or charm. [1913 Webster] {A greegree man}, an African magician or fetich priest. [1913 Webster]
A hard case
Case \Case\, n. [F. cas, fr. L. casus, fr. cadere to fall, to happen. Cf. {Chance}.] 1. Chance; accident; hap; opportunity. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] By aventure, or sort, or cas. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 2. That which befalls, comes, or happens; an event; an instance; a circumstance, or all the circumstances; condition; state of things; affair; as, a strange case; a case of injustice; the case of the Indian tribes. [1913 Webster] In any case thou shalt deliver him the pledge. --Deut. xxiv. 13. [1913 Webster] If the case of the man be so with his wife. --Matt. xix. 10. [1913 Webster] And when a lady's in the case You know all other things give place. --Gay. [1913 Webster] You think this madness but a common case. --Pope. [1913 Webster] I am in case to justle a constable, --Shak. [1913 Webster] 3. (Med. & Surg.) A patient under treatment; an instance of sickness or injury; as, ten cases of fever; also, the history of a disease or injury. [1913 Webster] A proper remedy in hypochondriacal cases. --Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] 4. (Law) The matters of fact or conditions involved in a suit, as distinguished from the questions of law; a suit or action at law; a cause. [1913 Webster] Let us consider the reason of the case, for nothing is law that is not reason. --Sir John Powell. [1913 Webster] Not one case in the reports of our courts. --Steele. [1913 Webster] 5. (Gram.) One of the forms, or the inflections or changes of form, of a noun, pronoun, or adjective, which indicate its relation to other words, and in the aggregate constitute its declension; the relation which a noun or pronoun sustains to some other word. [1913 Webster] Case is properly a falling off from the nominative or first state of word; the name for which, however, is now, by extension of its signification, applied also to the nominative. --J. W. Gibbs. [1913 Webster] Note: Cases other than the nominative are oblique cases. Case endings are terminations by which certain cases are distinguished. In old English, as in Latin, nouns had several cases distinguished by case endings, but in modern English only that of the possessive case is retained. [1913 Webster] {Action on the case} (Law), according to the old classification (now obsolete), was an action for redress of wrongs or injuries to person or property not specially provided against by law, in which the whole cause of complaint was set out in the writ; -- called also {trespass on the case}, or simply {case}. {All a case}, a matter of indifference. [Obs.] ``It is all a case to me.'' --L'Estrange. {Case at bar}. See under {Bar}, n. {Case divinity}, casuistry. {Case lawyer}, one versed in the reports of cases rather than in the science of the law. {Case stated} or {Case agreed on} (Law), a statement in writing of facts agreed on and submitted to the court for a decision of the legal points arising on them. {A hard case}, an abandoned or incorrigible person. [Colloq.] {In any case}, whatever may be the state of affairs; anyhow. {In case}, or {In case that}, if; supposing that; in the event or contingency; if it should happen that. ``In case we are surprised, keep by me.'' --W. Irving. {In good case}, in good condition, health, or state of body. {To put a case}, to suppose a hypothetical or illustrative case. Syn: Situation, condition, state; circumstances; plight; predicament; occurrence; contingency; accident; event; conjuncture; cause; action; suit. [1913 Webster]
A Heeji
Sand \Sand\, n. [AS. sand; akin to D. zand, G. sand, OHG. sant, Icel. sandr, Dan. & Sw. sand, Gr. ?.] 1. Fine particles of stone, esp. of siliceous stone, but not reduced to dust; comminuted stone in the form of loose grains, which are not coherent when wet. [1913 Webster] That finer matter, called sand, is no other than very small pebbles. --Woodward. [1913 Webster] 2. A single particle of such stone. [R.] --Shak. [1913 Webster] 3. The sand in the hourglass; hence, a moment or interval of time; the term or extent of one's life. [1913 Webster] The sands are numbered that make up my life. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 4. pl. Tracts of land consisting of sand, like the deserts of Arabia and Africa; also, extensive tracts of sand exposed by the ebb of the tide. ``The Libyan sands.'' --Milton. ``The sands o' Dee.'' --C. Kingsley. [1913 Webster] 5. Courage; pluck; grit. [Slang] [1913 Webster] {Sand badger} (Zo["o]l.), the Japanese badger ({Meles ankuma}). {Sand bag}. (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as in fortification, for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand, used as a club by assassins. {Sand ball}, soap mixed with sand, made into a ball for use at the toilet. {Sand bath}. (a) (Chem.) A vessel of hot sand in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated are partially immersed. (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in hot sand. {Sand bed}, a thick layer of sand, whether deposited naturally or artificially; specifically, a thick layer of sand into which molten metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. {Sand birds} (Zo["o]l.), a collective name for numerous species of limicoline birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many others; -- called also {shore birds}. {Sand blast}, a process of engraving and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand against them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in the process. {Sand box}. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover, for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent slipping. {Sand-box tree} (Bot.), a tropical American tree ({Hura crepitans}). Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which, when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds. See Illust. of {Regma}. {Sand bug} (Zo["o]l.), an American anomuran crustacean ({Hippa talpoidea}) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is often used as bait by fishermen. See Illust. under {Anomura}. {Sand canal} (Zo["o]l.), a tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and connecting the oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It appears to be excretory in function. {Sand cock} (Zo["o]l.), the redshank. [Prov. Eng.] {Sand collar}. (Zo["o]l.) Same as {Sand saucer}, below. {Sand crab}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or ocypodian. {Sand crack} (Far.), a crack extending downward from the coronet, in the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness. {Sand cricket} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of large terrestrial crickets of the genus {Stenophelmatus} and allied genera, native of the sandy plains of the Western United States. {Sand cusk} (Zo["o]l.), any ophidioid fish. See {Illust.} under {Ophidioid}. {Sand dab} (Zo["o]l.), a small American flounder ({Limanda ferruginea}); -- called also {rusty dab}. The name is also applied locally to other allied species. {Sand darter} (Zo["o]l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the Ohio valley ({Ammocrypta pellucida}). {Sand dollar} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on sandy bottoms, especially {Echinarachnius parma} of the American coast. {Sand drift}, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand. {Sand eel}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific Ocean fish of the genus {Gonorhynchus}, having barbels about the mouth. {Sand flag}, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. {Sand flea}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy places, especially the common dog flea. (b) The chigoe. (c) Any leaping amphipod crustacean; a beach flea, or orchestian. See {Beach flea}, under {Beach}. {Sand flood}, a vast body of sand borne along by the wind. --James Bruce. {Sand fluke}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The sandnecker. (b) The European smooth dab ({Pleuronectes microcephalus}); -- called also {kitt}, {marysole}, {smear dab}, {town dab}. {Sand fly} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus {Simulium}, abounding on sandy shores, especially {Simulium nocivum} of the United States. They are very troublesome on account of their biting habits. Called also {no-see-um}, {punky}, and {midge}. {Sand gall}. (Geol.) See {Sand pipe}, below. {Sand grass} (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in sand; especially, a tufted grass ({Triplasis purpurea}) with numerous bearded joints, and acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic coast. {Sand grouse} (Zo["o]l.), any one of many species of Old World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both grouse and pigeons. Called also {rock grouse}, {rock pigeon}, and {ganga}. They mostly belong to the genus {Pterocles}, as the common Indian species ({P. exustus}). The large sand grouse ({P. arenarius}), the painted sand grouse ({P. fasciatus}), and the pintail sand grouse ({P. alchata}) are also found in India. See Illust. under {Pterocletes}. {Sand hill}, a hill of sand; a dune. {Sand-hill crane} (Zo["o]l.), the American brown crane ({Grus Mexicana}). {Sand hopper} (Zo["o]l.), a beach flea; an orchestian. {Sand hornet} (Zo["o]l.), a sand wasp. {Sand lark}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small lark ({Alaudala raytal}), native of India. (b) A small sandpiper, or plover, as the ringneck, the sanderling, and the common European sandpiper. (c) The Australian red-capped dotterel ({[AE]gialophilus ruficapillus}); -- called also {red-necked plover}. {Sand launce} (Zo["o]l.), a lant, or launce. {Sand lizard} (Zo["o]l.), a common European lizard ({Lacerta agilis}). {Sand martin} (Zo["o]l.), the bank swallow. {Sand mole} (Zo["o]l.), the coast rat. {Sand monitor} (Zo["o]l.), a large Egyptian lizard ({Monitor arenarius}) which inhabits dry localities. {Sand mouse} (Zo["o]l.), the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] {Sand myrtle}. (Bot.) See under {Myrtle}. {Sand partridge} (Zo["o]l.), either of two small Asiatic partridges of the genus {Ammoperdix}. The wings are long and the tarsus is spurless. One species ({A. Heeji}) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The other species ({A. Bonhami}), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also {seesee partridge}, and {teehoo}. {Sand picture}, a picture made by putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. {Sand pike}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. {Sand pillar}, a sand storm which takes the form of a whirling pillar in its progress in desert tracts like those of the Sahara and Mongolia. {Sand pipe} (Geol.), a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in depth, occurring especially in calcareous rocks, and often filled with gravel, sand, etc.; -- called also {sand gall}. {Sand pride} (Zo["o]l.), a small British lamprey now considered to be the young of larger species; -- called also {sand prey}. {Sand pump}, in artesian well boring, a long, slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for raising sand from the well. {Sand rat} (Zo["o]l.), the pocket gopher. {Sand rock}, a rock made of cemented sand. {Sand runner} (Zo["o]l.), the turnstone. {Sand saucer} (Zo["o]l.), the mass of egg capsules, or o["o]thec[ae], of any mollusk of the genus {Natica} and allied genera. It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand; -- called also {sand collar}. {Sand screw} (Zo["o]l.), an amphipod crustacean ({Lepidactylis arenarius}), which burrows in the sandy seabeaches of Europe and America. {Sand shark} (Zo["o]l.), an American shark ({Odontaspis littoralis}) found on the sandy coasts of the Eastern United States; -- called also {gray shark}, and {dogfish shark}. See Illust. under {Remora}. {Sand skink} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus {Seps}; as, the ocellated sand skink ({Seps ocellatus}) of Southern Europe. {Sand skipper} (Zo["o]l.), a beach flea, or orchestian. {Sand smelt} (Zo["o]l.), a silverside. {Sand snake}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus {Eryx}, native of Southern Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially {E. jaculus} of India and {E. Johnii}, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African snake of the genus {Psammophis}, especially {P. sibilans}. {Sand snipe} (Zo["o]l.), the sandpiper. {Sand star} (Zo["o]l.), an ophiurioid starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. {Sand storm}, a cloud of sand driven violently by the wind. {Sand sucker}, the sandnecker. {Sand swallow} (Zo["o]l.), the bank swallow. See under {Bank}. {Sand trap}, (Golf) a shallow pit on a golf course having a layer of sand in it, usually located near a green, and designed to function as a hazard, due to the difficulty of hitting balls effectively from such a position. {Sand tube}, a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of vitrified sand, produced by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b) (Zo["o]l.) Any tube made of cemented sand. (c) (Zo["o]l.) In starfishes, a tube having calcareous particles in its wall, which connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. {Sand viper}. (Zo["o]l.) See {Hognose snake}. {Sand wasp} (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of hymenopterous insects belonging to the families {Pompilid[ae]} and {Spherid[ae]}, which dig burrows in sand. The female provisions the nest with insects or spiders which she paralyzes by stinging, and which serve as food for her young. [1913 Webster]
A incisa
Guttatrap \Gut"ta*trap\, n. The inspissated juice of a tree of the genus {Artocarpus} ({A. incisa}, or breadfruit tree), sometimes used in making birdlime, on account of its glutinous quality. [1913 Webster]
A kind of
Kind \Kind\, n. [OE. kinde, cunde, AS. cynd. See {Kind}, a.] 1. Nature; natural instinct or disposition. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] He knew by kind and by no other lore. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] Some of you, on pure instinct of nature, Are led by kind t'admire your fellow-creature. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. Race; genus; species; generic class; as, in mankind or humankind. ``Come of so low a kind.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] Every kind of beasts, and of birds. --James iii.7. [1913 Webster] She follows the law of her kind. --Wordsworth. [1913 Webster] Here to sow the seed of bread, That man and all the kinds be fed. --Emerson. [1913 Webster] 3. Sort; type; class; nature; style; character; fashion; manner; variety; description; as, there are several kinds of eloquence, of style, and of music; many kinds of government; various kinds of soil, etc. [1913 Webster] How diversely Love doth his pageants play, And snows his power in variable kinds ! --Spenser. [1913 Webster] There is one kind of flesh of men, another flesh of beasts, another of fishes, and another of birds. --I Cor. xv. 39. [1913 Webster] Diogenes was asked in a kind of scorn: What was the matter that philosophers haunted rich men, and not rich men philosophers? --Bacon. [1913 Webster] {A kind of}, something belonging to the class of; something like to; -- said loosely or slightingly. {In kind}, in the produce or designated commodity itself, as distinguished from its value in money. [1913 Webster] Tax on tillage was often levied in kind upon corn. --Arbuthnot. Syn: Sort; species; type; class; genus; nature; style; character; breed; set. [1913 Webster]
A labor of love
Love \Love\ (l[u^]v), n. [OE. love, luve, AS. lufe, lufu; akin to E. lief, believe, L. lubet, libet, it pleases, Skr. lubh to be lustful. See {Lief}.] 1. A feeling of strong attachment induced by that which delights or commands admiration; pre["e]minent kindness or devotion to another; affection; tenderness; as, the love of brothers and sisters. [1913 Webster] Of all the dearest bonds we prove Thou countest sons' and mothers' love Most sacred, most Thine own. --Keble. [1913 Webster] 2. Especially, devoted attachment to, or tender or passionate affection for, one of the opposite sex. [1913 Webster] He on his side Leaning half-raised, with looks of cordial love Hung over her enamored. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 3. Courtship; -- chiefly in the phrase to make love, i. e., to court, to woo, to solicit union in marriage. [1913 Webster] Demetrius . . . Made love to Nedar's daughter, Helena, And won her soul. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 4. Affection; kind feeling; friendship; strong liking or desire; fondness; good will; -- opposed to {hate}; often with of and an object. [1913 Webster] Love, and health to all. --Shak. [1913 Webster] Smit with the love of sacred song. --Milton. [1913 Webster] The love of science faintly warmed his breast. --Fenton. [1913 Webster] 5. Due gratitude and reverence to God. [1913 Webster] Keep yourselves in the love of God. --Jude 21. [1913 Webster] 6. The object of affection; -- often employed in endearing address; as, he held his love in his arms; his greatest love was reading. ``Trust me, love.'' --Dryden. [1913 Webster] Open the temple gates unto my love. --Spenser. [1913 Webster] 7. Cupid, the god of love; sometimes, Venus. [1913 Webster] Such was his form as painters, when they show Their utmost art, on naked Lores bestow. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] Therefore do nimble-pinioned doves draw Love. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 8. A thin silk stuff. [Obs.] --Boyle. [1913 Webster] 9. (Bot.) A climbing species of C{lematis} ({Clematis Vitalba}). [1913 Webster] 10. Nothing; no points scored on one side; -- used in counting score at tennis, etc. [1913 Webster] He won the match by three sets to love. --The Field. [1913 Webster] 11. Sexual intercourse; -- a euphemism. [PJC] Note: Love is often used in the formation of compounds, in most of which the meaning is very obvious; as, love-cracked, love-darting, love-killing, love-linked, love-taught, etc. [1913 Webster] {A labor of love}, a labor undertaken on account of regard for some person, or through pleasure in the work itself, without expectation of reward. {Free love}, the doctrine or practice of consorting with one of the opposite sex, at pleasure, without marriage. See {Free love}. {Free lover}, one who avows or practices free love. {In love}, in the act of loving; -- said esp. of the love of the sexes; as, to be in love; to fall in love. {Love apple} (Bot.), the tomato. {Love bird} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small, short-tailed parrots, or parrakeets, of the genus {Agapornis}, and allied genera. They are mostly from Africa. Some species are often kept as cage birds, and are celebrated for the affection which they show for their mates. {Love broker}, a person who for pay acts as agent between lovers, or as a go-between in a sexual intrigue. --Shak. {Love charm}, a charm for exciting love. --Ld. Lytton. {Love child}. an illegitimate child. --Jane Austen. {Love day}, a day formerly appointed for an amicable adjustment of differences. [Obs.] --Piers Plowman. --Chaucer. {Love drink}, a love potion; a philter. --Chaucer. {Love favor}, something given to be worn in token of love. {Love feast}, a religious festival, held quarterly by some religious denominations, as the Moravians and Methodists, in imitation of the agap[ae] of the early Christians. {Love feat}, the gallant act of a lover. --Shak. {Love game}, a game, as in tennis, in which the vanquished person or party does not score a point. {Love grass}. [G. liebesgras.] (Bot.) Any grass of the genus {Eragrostis}. {Love-in-a-mist}. (Bot.) (a) An herb of the Buttercup family ({Nigella Damascena}) having the flowers hidden in a maze of finely cut bracts. (b) The West Indian {Passiflora f[oe]tida}, which has similar bracts. {Love-in-idleness} (Bot.), a kind of violet; the small pansy. [1913 Webster] A little western flower, Before milk-white, now purple with love's wound; And maidens call it love-in-idleness. --Shak. {Love juice}, juice of a plant supposed to produce love. --Shak. {Love knot}, a knot or bow, as of ribbon; -- so called from being used as a token of love, or as a pledge of mutual affection. --Milman. {Love lass}, a sweetheart. {Love letter}, a letter of courtship. --Shak. {Love-lies-bleeding} (Bot.), a species of amaranth ({Amarantus melancholicus}). {Love match}, a marriage brought about by love alone. {Love potion}, a compounded draught intended to excite love, or venereal desire. {Love rites}, sexual intercourse. --Pope {Love scene}, an exhibition of love, as between lovers on the stage. {Love suit}, courtship. --Shak. {Of all loves}, for the sake of all love; by all means. [Obs.] ``Mrs. Arden desired him of all loves to come back again.'' --Holinshed. {The god of love}, or {The Love god}, Cupid. {To make love}, to engage in sexual intercourse; -- a euphemism. {To make love to}, to express affection for; to woo. ``If you will marry, make your loves to me.'' --Shak. {To play for love}, to play a game, as at cards, without stakes. ``A game at piquet for love.'' --Lamb. [1913 Webster +PJC] Syn: Affection; friendship; kindness; tenderness; fondness; delight. [1913 Webster]
A majus
Snapdragon \Snap"drag`on\, n. 1. (Bot.) (a) Any plant of the scrrophulariaceous genus {Antirrhinum}, especially the cultivated {A. majus}, whose showy flowers are fancifully likened to the face of a dragon. (b) A West Indian herb ({Ruellia tuberosa}) with curiously shaped blue flowers. [1913 Webster] 2. A play in which raisins are snatched from a vessel containing burning brandy, and eaten; also, that which is so eaten. See {Flapdragon}. --Swift. [1913 Webster]
A man of mark
Mark \Mark\, n. [OE. marke, merke, AS. mearc; akin to D. merk, MHG. marc, G. marke, Icel. mark, Dan. m[ae]rke; cf. Lith. margas party-colored. [root]106, 273. Cf. {Remark}.] 1. A visible sign or impression made or left upon anything; esp., a line, point, stamp, figure, or the like, drawn or impressed, so as to attract the attention and convey some information or intimation; a token; a trace. [1913 Webster] The Lord set a mark upon Cain, lest any finding him should kill him. --Gen. iv. 15. [1913 Webster] 2. Specifically: (a) A character or device put on an article of merchandise by the maker to show by whom it was made; a trade-mark. (b) A character (usually a cross) made as a substitute for a signature by one who can not write. [1913 Webster] The mark of the artisan is found upon the most ancient fabrics that have come to light. --Knight. [1913 Webster] 3. A fixed object serving for guidance, as of a ship, a traveler, a surveyor, etc.; as, a seamark, a landmark. [1913 Webster] 4. A trace, dot, line, imprint, or discoloration, although not regarded as a token or sign; a scratch, scar, stain, etc.; as, this pencil makes a fine mark. [1913 Webster] I have some marks of yours upon my pate. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 5. An evidence of presence, agency, or influence; a significative token; a symptom; a trace; specifically, a permanent impression of one's activity or character. [1913 Webster] The confusion of tongues was a mark of separation. --Bacon. [1913 Webster] 6. That toward which a missile is directed; a thing aimed at; what one seeks to hit or reach. [1913 Webster] France was a fairer mark to shoot at than Ireland. --Davies. [1913 Webster] Whate'er the motive, pleasure is the mark. --Young. [1913 Webster] 7. Attention, regard, or respect. [1913 Webster] As much in mock as mark. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 8. Limit or standard of action or fact; as, to be within the mark; to come up to the mark. [1913 Webster] 9. Badge or sign of honor, rank, or official station. [1913 Webster] In the official marks invested, you Anon do meet the Senate. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 10. Pre["e]minence; high position; as, patricians of mark; a fellow of no mark. [1913 Webster] 11. (Logic) A characteristic or essential attribute; a differential. [1913 Webster] 12. A number or other character used in registering; as, examination marks; a mark for tardiness. [1913 Webster] 13. Image; likeness; hence, those formed in one's image; children; descendants. [Obs.] ``All the mark of Adam.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 14. (Naut.) One of the bits of leather or colored bunting which are placed upon a sounding line at intervals of from two to five fathoms. The unmarked fathoms are called ``deeps.'' [1913 Webster] {A man of mark}, a conspicuous or eminent man. {To make one's mark}. (a) To sign, as a letter or other writing, by making a cross or other mark. (b) To make a distinct or lasting impression on the public mind, or on affairs; to gain distinction. [1913 Webster] Syn: Impress; impression; stamp; print; trace; vestige; track; characteristic; evidence; proof; token; badge; indication; symptom. [1913 Webster]
A marila
Scaup \Scaup\ (sk[add]p), n. [See {Scalp} a bed of oysters or mussels.] 1. A bed or stratum of shellfish; scalp. [Scot.] [1913 Webster] 2. (Zo["o]l.) A scaup duck. See below. [1913 Webster] {Scaup duck} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of northern ducks of the genus {Aythya}, or {Fuligula}. The adult males are, in large part, black. The three North American species are: the greater scaup duck ({Aythya marila}, var. nearctica), called also {broadbill}, {bluebill}, {blackhead}, {flock duck}, {flocking fowl}, and {raft duck}; the lesser scaup duck ({A. affinis}), called also {little bluebill}, {river broadbill}, and {shuffler}; the tufted, or ring-necked, scaup duck ({A. collaris}), called also {black jack}, {ringneck}, {ringbill}, {ringbill shuffler}, etc. See Illust. of {Ring-necked duck}, under {Ring-necked}. The common European scaup, or mussel, duck ({A. marila}), closely resembles the American variety. [1913 Webster]
A marked man
Marked \Marked\ (m[aum]rkt), a. Designated or distinguished by, or as by, a mark; hence; noticeable; conspicuous; as, a marked card; a marked coin; a marked instance. -- {Mark"ed*ly}, adv. --J. S. Mill. [1913 Webster] {A marked man}, a man who is noted by a community, or by a part of it, as, for excellence or depravity; -- usually with an unfavorable suggestion. [1913 Webster]
a McIntire joint
Sleeve \Sleeve\, n. [OE. sleeve, sleve, AS. sl?fe, sl?fe; akin to sl?fan to put on, to clothe; cf. OD. sloove the turning up of anything, sloven to turn up one's sleeves, sleve a sleeve, G. schlaube a husk, pod.] 1. The part of a garment which covers the arm; as, the sleeve of a coat or a gown. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 2. A narrow channel of water. [R.] [1913 Webster] The Celtic Sea, called oftentimes the Sleeve. --Drayton. [1913 Webster] 3. (Mach.) (a) A tubular part made to cover, sustain, or steady another part, or to form a connection between two parts. (b) A long bushing or thimble, as in the nave of a wheel. (c) A short piece of pipe used for covering a joint, or forming a joint between the ends of two other pipes. [1913 Webster] 4. (Elec.) A double tube of copper, in section like the figure 8, into which the ends of bare wires are pushed so that when the tube is twisted an electrical connection is made. The joint thus made is called {a McIntire joint}. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] {Sleeve button}, a detachable button to fasten the wristband or cuff. {Sleeve links}, two bars or buttons linked together, and used to fasten a cuff or wristband. {To laugh in the sleeve} or {To laugh up one's sleeve} to laugh privately or unperceived, especially while apparently preserving a grave or serious demeanor toward the person or persons laughed at; that is, perhaps, originally, by hiding the face in the wide sleeves of former times. {To pinon the sleeve of}, or {To hang on the sleeve of}, to be, or make, dependent upon. [1913 Webster]
A mensa et thoro
A mensa et thoro \A men"sa et tho"ro\ [L., from board and bed.] (Law) A kind of divorce which does not dissolve the marriage bond, but merely authorizes a separate life of the husband and wife. --Abbott. [1913 Webster]
a Minors Gray Friars or Franciscans
Friar \Fri"ar\, n. [OR. frere, F. fr[`e]re brother, friar, fr. L. frater brother. See {Brother}.] 1. (R. C. Ch.) A brother or member of any religious order, but especially of one of the four mendicant orders, viz: {(a) Minors, Gray Friars, or Franciscans.} {(b) Augustines}. {(c) Dominicans or Black Friars.} {(d) White Friars or Carmelites.} See these names in the Vocabulary. [1913 Webster] 2. (Print.) A white or pale patch on a printed page. [1913 Webster] 3. (Zo["o]l.) An American fish; the silversides. [1913 Webster] {Friar bird} (Zo["o]l.), an Australian bird ({Tropidorhynchus corniculatus}), having the head destitute of feathers; -- called also {coldong}, {leatherhead}, {pimlico}; {poor soldier}, and {four-o'clock}. The name is also applied to several other species of the same genus. {Friar's balsam} (Med.), a stimulating application for wounds and ulcers, being an alcoholic solution of benzoin, styrax, tolu balsam, and aloes; compound tincture of benzoin. --Brande & C. {Friar's cap} (Bot.), the monkshood. {Friar's cowl} (Bot.), an arumlike plant ({Arisarum vulgare}) with a spathe or involucral leaf resembling a cowl. {Friar's lantern}, the ignis fatuus or Will-o'-the-wisp. --Milton. {Friar skate} (Zo["o]l.), the European white or sharpnosed skate ({Raia alba}); -- called also {Burton skate}, {border ray}, {scad}, and {doctor}. [1913 Webster]
A month mind
Month \Month\ (m[u^]nth), n. [OE. month, moneth, AS. m[=o]n[eth], m[=o]na[eth]; akin to m[=o]na moon, and to D. maand month, G. monat, OHG. m[=a]n[=o]d, Icel. m[=a]nu[eth]r, m[=a]na[eth]r, Goth. m[=e]n[=o][thorn]s. [root]272. See {Moon}.] One of the twelve portions into which the year is divided; the twelfth part of a year, corresponding nearly to the length of a synodic revolution of the moon, -- whence the name. In popular use, a period of four weeks is often called a month. [1913 Webster] Note: In the common law, a month is a lunar month, or twenty-eight days, unless otherwise expressed. --Blackstone. In the United States the rule of the common law is generally changed, and a month is declared to mean a calendar month. --Cooley's Blackstone. [1913 Webster] {A month mind}. (a) A strong or abnormal desire. [Obs.] --Shak. (b) A celebration made in remembrance of a deceased person a month after death. --Strype. {Calendar months}, the months as adjusted in the common or Gregorian calendar; April, June, September, and November, containing 30 days, and the rest 31, except February, which, in common years, has 28, and in leap years 29. {Lunar month}, the period of one revolution of the moon, particularly a synodical revolution; but several kinds are distinguished, as the {synodical month}, or period from one new moon to the next, in mean length 29 d. 12 h. 44 m. 2.87 s.; the {nodical month}, or time of revolution from one node to the same again, in length 27 d. 5 h. 5 m. 36 s.; the {sidereal}, or time of revolution from a star to the same again, equal to 27 d. 7 h. 43 m. 11.5 s.; the {anomalistic}, or time of revolution from perigee to perigee again, in length 27 d. 13 h. 18 m. 37.4 s.; and the {tropical}, or time of passing from any point of the ecliptic to the same again, equal to 27 d. 7 h. 43 m. 4.7 s. {Solar month}, the time in which the sun passes through one sign of the zodiac, in mean length 30 d. 10 h. 29 m. 4.1 s. [1913 Webster]
A murrain on you
Murrain \Mur"rain\, n. [OE. moreine, OF. morine, fr. OF. morir, murir, 8die, L. mori, moriri.] (Far.) An infectious and fatal disease among cattle. --Bacon. [1913 Webster] {A murrain on you}, may you be afflicted with a pestilent disease. --Shak. [1913 Webster]
a naked debenture
Debenture \De*ben"ture\ (?; 135), n. [L. debentur they are due, fr. debere to owe; cf. F. debentur. So called because these receipts began with the words Debentur mihi.] 1. A writing acknowledging a debt; a writing or certificate signed by a public officer, as evidence of a debt due to some person; the sum thus due. [1913 Webster] 2. A customhouse certificate entitling an exporter of imported goods to a drawback of duties paid on their importation. --Burrill. [1913 Webster] Note: It is applied in England to deeds of mortgage given by railway companies for borrowed money; also to municipal and other bonds and securities for money loaned. [1913 Webster] 3. Any of various instruments issued, esp. by corporations, as evidences of debt. Such instruments (often called {debenture bonds}) are generally, through not necessarily, under seal, and are usually secured by a mortgage or other charge upon property; they may be registered or unregistered. A debenture secured by a mortgage on specific property is called a {mortgage debenture}; one secured by a floating charge (which see), a {floating debenture}; one not secured by any charge {a naked debenture}. In general the term debenture in British usage designates any security issued by companies other than their shares, including, therefore, what are in the United States commonly called {bonds}. When used in the United States debenture generally designates an instrument secured by a floating charge junior to other charges secured by fixed mortgages, or, specif., one of a series of securities secured by a group of securities held in trust for the benefit of the debenture holders. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
A note shaver
Shaver \Shav"er\, n. 1. One who shaves; one whose occupation is to shave. [1913 Webster] 2. One who is close in bargains; a sharper. --Swift. [1913 Webster] 3. One who fleeces; a pillager; a plunderer. [1913 Webster] By these shavers the Turks were stripped. --Knolles. [1913 Webster] 4. A boy; a lad; a little fellow. [Colloq.] ``These unlucky little shavers.'' --Salmagundi. [1913 Webster] As I have mentioned at the door to this young shaver, I am on a chase in the name of the king. --Dickens. [1913 Webster] 5. (Mech.) A tool or machine for shaving. [1913 Webster] {A note shaver}, a person who buys notes at a discount greater than the legal rate of interest. [Cant, U.S.] [1913 Webster]
A Novae-Hollandiae
Goshawk \Gos"hawk`\, n. [AS. g[=o]shafuc, lit., goosehawk; or Icel. g[=a]shaukr. See {Goose}, and {Hawk} the bird.] (Zo["o]l.) Any large hawk of the genus {Astur}, of which many species and varieties are known. The European ({Astur palumbarius}) and the American ({A. atricapillus}) are the best known species. They are noted for their powerful flight, activity, and courage. The Australian goshawk ({A. Nov[ae]-Hollandi[ae]}) is pure white. [1913 Webster]
A octomaculata
Forester \For"est*er\, n. [F. forestier, LL. forestarius.] 1. One who has charge of the growing timber on an estate; an officer appointed to watch a forest and preserve the game. [1913 Webster] 2. An inhabitant of a forest. --Wordsworth. [1913 Webster] 3. A forest tree. [R.] --Evelyn. [1913 Webster] 4. (Zo["o]l.) A lepidopterous insect belonging to {Alypia} and allied genera; as, the eight-spotted forester ({A. octomaculata}), which in the larval state is injurious to the grapevine. [1913 Webster]
A pair of bellows
Bellows \Bel"lows\, n. sing. & pl. [OE. bely, below, belly, bellows, AS. b[ae]lg, b[ae]lig, bag, bellows, belly. Bellows is prop. a pl. and the orig. sense is bag. See {Belly}.] An instrument, utensil, or machine, which, by alternate expansion and contraction, or by rise and fall of the top, draws in air through a valve and expels it through a tube for various purposes, as blowing fires, ventilating mines, or filling the pipes of an organ with wind. [1913 Webster] {Bellows camera}, in photography, a form of camera, which can be drawn out like an accordion or bellows. {Hydrostatic bellows}. See {Hydrostatic}. {A pair of bellows}, the ordinary household instrument for blowing fires, consisting of two nearly heart-shaped boards with handles, connected by leather, and having a valve and tube. [1913 Webster]
A per se
A \A\ (named [=a] in the English, and most commonly ["a] in other languages). The first letter of the English and of many other alphabets. The capital A of the alphabets of Middle and Western Europe, as also the small letter (a), besides the forms in Italic, black letter, etc., are all descended from the old Latin A, which was borrowed from the Greek {Alpha}, of the same form; and this was made from the first letter (?) of the Ph[oe]nician alphabet, the equivalent of the Hebrew Aleph, and itself from the Egyptian origin. The Aleph was a consonant letter, with a guttural breath sound that was not an element of Greek articulation; and the Greeks took it to represent their vowel Alpha with the ["a] sound, the Ph[oe]nician alphabet having no vowel symbols. [1913 Webster] This letter, in English, is used for several different vowel sounds. See Guide to pronunciation, [sect][sect] 43-74. The regular long a, as in fate, etc., is a comparatively modern sound, and has taken the place of what, till about the early part of the 17th century, was a sound of the quality of ["a] (as in far). [1913 Webster] 2. (Mus.) The name of the sixth tone in the model major scale (that in C), or the first tone of the minor scale, which is named after it the scale in A minor. The second string of the violin is tuned to the A in the treble staff. -- A sharp (A[sharp]) is the name of a musical tone intermediate between A and B. -- A flat (A[flat]) is the name of a tone intermediate between A and G. [1913 Webster] {A per se} (L. per se by itself), one pre["e]minent; a nonesuch. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] O fair Creseide, the flower and A per se Of Troy and Greece. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]
A piece of bric-a-brac
Bric-a brac \Bric"-a brac`\, n. [F.] Miscellaneous curiosities and works of decorative art, considered collectively. [1913 Webster] {A piece of bric-a-brac}, any curious or antique article of virtu, as a piece of antiquated furniture or metal work, or an odd knickknack. [1913 Webster]
A piece of money
Money \Mon"ey\, n.; pl. {Moneys}. [OE. moneie, OF. moneie, F. monnaie, fr. L. moneta. See {Mint} place where coin is made, {Mind}, and cf. {Moidore}, {Monetary}.] 1. A piece of metal, as gold, silver, copper, etc., coined, or stamped, and issued by the sovereign authority as a medium of exchange in financial transactions between citizens and with government; also, any number of such pieces; coin. [1913 Webster] To prevent such abuses, . . . it has been found necessary . . . to affix a public stamp upon certain quantities of such particular metals, as were in those countries commonly made use of to purchase goods. Hence the origin of coined money, and of those public offices called mints. --A. Smith. [1913 Webster] 2. Any written or stamped promise, certificate, or order, as a government note, a bank note, a certificate of deposit, etc., which is payable in standard coined money and is lawfully current in lieu of it; in a comprehensive sense, any currency usually and lawfully employed in buying and selling. [1913 Webster] 3. Any article used as a medium of payment in financial transactions, such as checks drawn on checking accounts. [PJC] 4. (Economics) Any form of wealth which affects a person's propensity to spend, such as checking accounts or time deposits in banks, credit accounts, letters of credit, etc. Various aggregates of money in different forms are given different names, such as {M-1}, the total sum of all currency in circulation plus all money in demand deposit accounts (checking accounts). [PJC] Note: Whatever, among barbarous nations, is used as a medium of effecting exchanges of property, and in the terms of which values are reckoned, as sheep, wampum, copper rings, quills of salt or of gold dust, shovel blades, etc., is, in common language, called their money. [1913 Webster] 4. In general, wealth; property; as, he has much money in land, or in stocks; to make, or lose, money. [1913 Webster] The love of money is a root of all kinds of evil. --1 Tim vi. 10 (Rev. Ver. ). [1913 Webster] {Money bill} (Legislation), a bill for raising revenue. {Money broker}, a broker who deals in different kinds of money; one who buys and sells bills of exchange; -- called also {money changer}. {Money cowrie} (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of {Cypr[ae]a} (esp. {Cypr[ae]a moneta}) formerly much used as money by savage tribes. See {Cowrie}. {Money of account}, a denomination of value used in keeping accounts, for which there may, or may not, be an equivalent coin; e. g., the mill is a money of account in the United States, but not a coin. {Money order}, (a) an order for the payment of money; specifically, a government order for the payment of money, issued at one post office as payable at another; -- called also {postal money order}. (b) a similar order issued by a bank or other financial institution. {Money scrivener}, a person who procures the loan of money to others. [Eng.] {Money spider}, {Money spinner} (Zo["o]l.), a small spider; -- so called as being popularly supposed to indicate that the person upon whom it crawls will be fortunate in money matters. {Money's worth}, a fair or full equivalent for the money which is paid. {A piece of money}, a single coin. {Ready money}, money held ready for payment, or actually paid, at the time of a transaction; cash. {plastic money}, credit cards, usually made out of plastic; also called {plastic}; as, put it on the plastic. {To make money}, to gain or acquire money or property; to make a profit in dealings. [1913 Webster +PJC]
a piece of virtu
Virtu \Vir*tu"\ (?; 277), n. [It. virt[`u] virtue, excellence, from L. virtus. See {Virtue}.] A love of the fine arts; a taste for curiosities. --J. Spence. [1913 Webster] {An article of virtu}, or {a piece of virtu}, an object of art or antiquity; a curiosity, such as those found in museums or private collections. [1913 Webster] I had thoughts, in my chambers to place it in view, To be shown to my friends as a piece of virt[`u]. --Goldsmith. [1913 Webster]
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