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Results found: 168

Dictionary : all dictionaries

insect

Result Translation News
Citrus quarantine in effect in California
8 Feb 2014
By DANIELLE HAYNES, UPI.com VISALIA, Calif., Feb. 8 (UPI) -- Four California counties included in citrus quarantine due to disease-carrying insect, the psyllid.
Emerald ash borer infestation found in Dayton's Bluff
7 Feb 2014
St. Paul forestry workers came upon an unwelcome sight this week while surveying the Metropolitan State University campus: emerald ash borer larvae -- and plenty of it.
Plants and the human brain: Why humans think like insects
7 Feb 2014
Similarities between human and insect brains could be the reason why humans are attracted to plant-derived chemicals, such as tea, coffee, tobacco and drugs, according to a new book.
Similarities between human and insect brains could be behind our liking for tea
7 Feb 2014
SIMILARITIES between human and insect brains could be the reason why humans are attracted to plant-derived chemicals, such as tea, coffee, tobacco and drugs, according to a new book.
Gardening: Conltrolling your insect population
5 Feb 2014
Our weather allows for insect activity year round. For those of you who prefer to try the natural way of controlling pests in your yard there is integrated pest management. When using integrated pest management in your yard proper identification of insect
Sticky: New Animated Film Will Break Your Heart
5 Feb 2014
A new animated film tells the story of this critically endangered insect with a surprising emotional punch.        
Robot Uses Insect Brain To Navigate Arena
4 Feb 2014
[ Watch the Video: Robotic Honey Bee Brains ] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The worst fears of those suffering from insectophobia ( entomophobia ) are being met with the latest development out of Berlin — robots with insect brains. Scientists using the nervous system of the honeybee as a model have developed a robot that perceives environmental stimuli and learns to react ...
Beneficial insects, nematodes not harmed by genetically modified, insect-resistant crops
3 Feb 2014
Two new studies show that genetically modified Bt crops have no negative effects on two beneficial insect predators or on a beneficial, entomopathogenic nematode.
Cyborg insect created using fuel cell powered by own body fluid
31 Jan 2014
One day we’re going to have robot drones that are no bigger than a mosquito, but we’ve got a long way to go on the miniaturization front before that happens. In the meantime, […]
K-State Insect Zoo features kid-friendly exhibits, family attractions
28 Jan 2014
K-State Insect Zoo, part of K-State's Entomology department, serves student body and community The post K-State Insect Zoo features kid-friendly exhibits, family attractions appeared first on The Collegian .
insect
ˈɪnsekt n. 1 a any arthropod of the class Insecta, having a head, thorax, abdomen, two antennae, three pairs of thoracic legs, and usu. one or two pairs of thoracic wings. b (loosely) any other small segmented invertebrate animal. 2 an insignificant or contemptible person or creature. øøinsectile adj. [L insectum (animal) notched (animal) f. insecare insect- (as IN-(2), secare cut)]
insect
ˈɪnsekt n. 1 a any arthropod of the class Insecta, having a head, thorax, abdomen, two antennae, three pairs of thoracic legs, and usu. one or two pairs of thoracic wings. b (loosely) any other small segmented invertebrate animal. 2 an insignificant or contemptible person or creature. øøinsectile adj. [L insectum (animal) notched (animal) f. insecare insect- (as IN-(2), secare cut)]
insect
'insekt
insect
Insekt {n}
Insect
Insect \In"sect\ ([i^]n"s[e^]kt), n. [F. insecte, L. insectum, fr. insectus, p. p. of insecare to cut in. See {Section}. The name was originally given to certain small animals, whose bodies appear cut in, or almost divided. Cf. {Entomology}.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) One of the Insecta; esp., one of the Hexapoda. See {Insecta}. [1913 Webster] Note: The hexapod insects pass through three stages during their growth, viz., the larva, pupa, and imago or adult, but in some of the orders the larva differs little from the imago, except in lacking wings, and the active pupa is very much like the larva, except in having rudiments of wings. In the higher orders, the larva is usually a grub, maggot, or caterpillar, totally unlike the adult, while the pupa is very different from both larva and imago and is inactive, taking no food. [1913 Webster] 2. (Zo["o]l.) Any air-breathing arthropod, as a spider or scorpion. [1913 Webster] 3. (Zo["o]l.) Any small crustacean. In a wider sense, the word is often loosely applied to various small invertebrates. [1913 Webster] 4. Fig.: Any small, trivial, or contemptible person or thing. --Thomson. [1913 Webster] {Insect powder},a powder used for the extermination of insects; esp., the powdered flowers of certain species of {Pyrethrum}, a genus now merged in {Chrysanthemum}. Called also {Persian powder}. [1913 Webster]
Insect
Insect \In"sect\, a. 1. Of or pertaining to an insect or insects. [1913 Webster] 2. Like an insect; small; mean; ephemeral. [1913 Webster]
insect
noun Etymology: Latin insectum, from neuter of insectus, past participle of insecare to cut into, from in- + secare to cut — more at saw Date: 1601 1. a. any of numerous small invertebrate animals (as spiders or centipedes) that are more or less obviously segmented — not used technically b. any of a class (Insecta) of arthropods (as bugs or bees) with well-defined head, thorax, and abdomen, only three pairs of legs, and typically one or two pairs of wings 2. a trivial or contemptible person • insect adjective
insect
n. 1 a any arthropod of the class Insecta, having a head, thorax, abdomen, two antennae, three pairs of thoracic legs, and usu. one or two pairs of thoracic wings. b (loosely) any other small segmented invertebrate animal. 2 an insignificant or contemptible person or creature. Derivatives: insectile adj. Etymology: L insectum (animal) notched (animal) f. insecare insect- (as IN-(2), secare cut)
Insect
Insect \In"sect\, a. 1. Of or pertaining to an insect or insects. 2. Like an insect; small; mean; ephemeral.
Insect
Insect \In"sect\, n. [F. insecte, L. insectum, fr. insectus, p. p. of insecare to cut in. See {Section}. The name was originally given to certain small animals, whose bodies appear cut in, or almost divided. Cf. {Entomology}.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) One of the Insecta; esp., one of the Hexapoda. See {Insecta}. Note: The hexapod insects pass through three stages during their growth, viz., the larva, pupa, and imago or adult, but in some of the orders the larva differs little from the imago, except in lacking wings, and the active pupa is very much like the larva, except in having rudiments of wings. In the higher orders, the larva is usually a grub, maggot, or caterpillar, totally unlike the adult, while the pupa is very different from both larva and imago and is inactive, taking no food. 2. (Zo["o]l.) Any air-breathing arthropod, as a spider or scorpion. 3. (Zo["o]l.) Any small crustacean. In a wider sense, the word is often loosely applied to various small invertebrates. 4. Fig.: Any small, trivial, or contemptible person or thing. --Thomson.
Insect
(n.) One of the Insecta; esp., one of the Hexapoda. See Insecta.
insect
insect n 1: small air-breathing arthropod 2: has a nasty or unethical character undeserving of respect [syn: {worm}, {louse}, {dirt ball}]
Insect (2)
(n.) Any air-breathing arthropod, as a spider or scorpion.
Insect (3)
(n.) Any small crustacean. In a wider sense, the word is often loosely applied to various small invertebrates.
Insect (4)
(n.) Fig.: Any small, trivial, or contemptible person or thing.
Insect (5)
(a.) Of or pertaining to an insect or insects.
Insect (6)
(a.) Like an insect; small; mean; ephemeral.
insect bite
insect bite n : a painful wound caused by the thrust of a stinger into skin [syn: {sting}, {bite}]
Insect powder
Insect \In"sect\ ([i^]n"s[e^]kt), n. [F. insecte, L. insectum, fr. insectus, p. p. of insecare to cut in. See {Section}. The name was originally given to certain small animals, whose bodies appear cut in, or almost divided. Cf. {Entomology}.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) One of the Insecta; esp., one of the Hexapoda. See {Insecta}. [1913 Webster] Note: The hexapod insects pass through three stages during their growth, viz., the larva, pupa, and imago or adult, but in some of the orders the larva differs little from the imago, except in lacking wings, and the active pupa is very much like the larva, except in having rudiments of wings. In the higher orders, the larva is usually a grub, maggot, or caterpillar, totally unlike the adult, while the pupa is very different from both larva and imago and is inactive, taking no food. [1913 Webster] 2. (Zo["o]l.) Any air-breathing arthropod, as a spider or scorpion. [1913 Webster] 3. (Zo["o]l.) Any small crustacean. In a wider sense, the word is often loosely applied to various small invertebrates. [1913 Webster] 4. Fig.: Any small, trivial, or contemptible person or thing. --Thomson. [1913 Webster] {Insect powder},a powder used for the extermination of insects; esp., the powdered flowers of certain species of {Pyrethrum}, a genus now merged in {Chrysanthemum}. Called also {Persian powder}. [1913 Webster]
Insect powder
{Insect powder},a powder used for the extermination of insects; esp., the powdered flowers of certain species of {Pyrethrum}, a genus now merged in {Chrysanthemum}. Called also {Persian powder}.
insect powder
insect powder n : a chemical used to kill insects [syn: {insecticide}]
insect repellant
insect repellant n : a chemical substance that repels insects [syn: {insectifuge}, {insect repellent}]
insect repellent
insect repellent n : a chemical substance that repels insects [syn: {insectifuge}, {insect repellant}]
insect-eater
'insektˌi:tə
insect-net
'insektnet
insect-powder
'insektˌpaudə
Insecta
Insecta \In*sec"ta\, n. pl. [NL. See {Insect}.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) One of the classes of Arthropoda, including those that have one pair of antenn[ae], three pairs of mouth organs, and breathe air by means of trache[ae], opening by spiracles along the sides of the body. In this sense it includes the Hexapoda, or six-legged insects and the Myriapoda, with numerous legs. See {Insect}, n. [1913 Webster] 2. (Zo["o]l.) In a more restricted sense, the Hexapoda alone. See {Hexapoda}. [1913 Webster] 3. (Zo["o]l.) In the most general sense, the Hexapoda, Myriapoda, and Arachnoidea, combined. [1913 Webster] Note: The typical Insecta, or hexapod insects, are divided into several orders, viz.: {Hymenoptera}, as the bees and ants; {Diptera}, as the common flies, gnats, and mosquitos; {Aphaniptera}, or fleas; {Lepidoptera}, or moths and butterflies; {Neuroptera}, as the ant-lions and hellgamite; {Coleoptera}, or beetles; {Hemiptera}, as bugs, lice, aphids; {Orthoptera}, as grasshoppers and cockroaches; {Pseudoneuroptera}, as the dragon flies and termites; {Euplexoptera}, or earwigs; {Thysanura}, as the springtails, podura, and lepisma. See these words in the Vocabulary. [1913 Webster]
Insecta
Insecta \In*sec"ta\, n. pl. [NL. See {Insect}.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) One of the classes of Arthropoda, including those that have one pair of antenn[ae], three pairs of mouth organs, and breathe air by means of trache[ae], opening by spiracles along the sides of the body. In this sense it includes the Hexapoda, or six-legged insects and the Myriapoda, with numerous legs. See {Insect}, n. 2. (Zo["o]l.) In a more restricted sense, the Hexapoda alone. See {Hexapoda}. 3. (Zo["o]l.) In the most general sense, the Hexapoda, Myriapoda, and Arachnoidea, combined. Note: The typical Insecta, or hexapod insects, are divided into several orders, viz.: {Hymenoptera}, as the bees and ants; {Diptera}, as the common flies and gnats; {Aphaniptera}, or fleas; {Lepidoptera}, or moths and butterflies; {Neuroptera}, as the ant-lions and hellgamite; {Coleoptera}, or beetles; {Hemiptera}, as bugs, lice, aphids; {Orthoptera}, as grasshoppers and cockroaches; {Pseudoneuroptera}, as the dragon flies and termites; {Euplexoptera}, or earwings; {Thysanura}, as the springtails, podura, and lepisma. See these words in the Vocabulary.
Insecta
(n. pl.) One of the classes of Arthropoda, including those that have one pair of antennae, three pairs of mouth organs, and breathe air by means of tracheae, opening by spiracles along the sides of the body. In this sense it includes the Hexapoda, or six-legged insects and the Myriapoda, with numerous legs. See Insect, n.
Insecta
Insecta n : insects; about five-sixths of all known animal species [syn: {Insecta}, {class Insecta}, {Hexapoda}, {class Hexapoda}]
Insecta (2)
(n.) In a more restricted sense, the Hexapoda alone. See Hexapoda.
Insecta (3)
(n.) In the most general sense, the Hexapoda, Myriapoda, and Arachnoidea, combined.
insectan
insectan adj : of or relating to the class Insecta
insectarium
n. (also insectary) (pl. insectariums or insectaries) a place for keeping insects.
insectarium
n. (also insectary) (pl. insectariums or insectaries) a place for keeping insects.
Insectarium
Insectary \In"sec*ta*ry\, n. A place for keeping living insects. -- {In`sec*ta"ri*um}, n. [L.] [1913 Webster]
insectarium
n. (also insectary) (pl. insectariums or insectaries) a place for keeping insects.
Insectarium
Insectary \In"sec*ta*ry\, n. A place for keeping living insects. -- {In`sec*ta"ri*um}, n. [L.]
Insectary
Insectary \In"sec*ta*ry\, n. A place for keeping living insects. -- {In`sec*ta"ri*um}, n. [L.] [1913 Webster]
insectary
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1888 a place for the keeping or rearing of living insects
Insectary
Insectary \In"sec*ta*ry\, n. A place for keeping living insects. -- {In`sec*ta"ri*um}, n. [L.]
Insectary
(n.) A place for keeping living insects.
Insectation
Insectation \In`sec*ta"tion\, n. [L. insectatio. See {Insectator}.] The act of pursuing; pursuit; harassment; persecution. [Obs.] --Sir T. More. [1913 Webster]
Insectation
Insectation \In`sec*ta"tion\, n. [L. insectatio. See {Insectator}.] The act of pursuing; pursuit; harassment; persecution. [Obs.] --Sir T. More.
Insectation
(n.) The act of pursuing; pursuit; harassment; persecution.
Insectator
Insectator \In`sec*ta"tor\, n. [L., fr. insectari to pursue, freq. fr. insequi. See {Ensue}.] A pursuer; a persecutor; a censorious critic. [Obs.] --Bailey. [1913 Webster]
Insectator
Insectator \In`sec*ta"tor\, n. [L., fr. insectari to pursue, freq. fr. insequi. See {Ensue}.] A pursuer; a persecutor; a censorious critic. [Obs.] --Bailey.
Insectator
(n.) A pursuer; a persecutor; a censorious critic.
Insected
Insected \In"sect*ed\, a. Pertaining to, having the nature of, or resembling, an insect. --Howell. [1913 Webster]
Insected
Insected \In"sect*ed\, a. Pertaining to, having the nature of, or resembling, an insect. --Howell.
Insected
(a.) Pertaining to, having the nature of, or resembling, an insect.
Insecticidal
Insecticide \In*sec"ti*cide\, n. [Insect + L. caedere to kill.] An agent or preparation for destroying insects; an insect powder or spray. -- {In*sec"ti*ci`dal}, a. [1913 Webster]
insecticidal
adjective Date: 1857 1. destroying or controlling insects 2. of or relating to an insecticide • insecticidally adverb
Insecticidal
Insecticide \In*sec"ti*cide\, n. [Insect + L. caedere to kill.] An agent or preparation for destroying insects; an insect powder. -- {In*sec"ti*ci`dal}, a.
insecticidally
adverb see insecticidal
insecticide
ɪnˈsektɪsaɪd n. a substance used for killing insects. øøinsecticidal adj.
insecticide
ɪnˈsektɪsaɪd n. a substance used for killing insects. øøinsecticidal adj.
insecticide
in'sektisaid
insecticide
Insektengift {n}
Insecticide
Insecticide \In*sec"ti*cide\, n. [Insect + L. caedere to kill.] An agent or preparation for destroying insects; an insect powder or spray. -- {In*sec"ti*ci`dal}, a. [1913 Webster]
insecticide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1865 an agent that destroys insects
insecticide
n. a substance used for killing insects. Derivatives: insecticidal adj.
Insecticide
Insecticide \In*sec"ti*cide\, n. [Insect + L. caedere to kill.] An agent or preparation for destroying insects; an insect powder. -- {In*sec"ti*ci`dal}, a.
Insecticide
(n.) An agent or preparation for destroying insects; an insect powder.
insecticide
insecticide n : a chemical used to kill insects [syn: {insect powder}]
insectifuge
insectifuge n : a chemical substance that repels insects [syn: {insect repellent}, {insect repellant}]
Insectile
Insectile \In*sec"tile\, a. Pertaining to, or having the nature of, insects. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]
insectile
adjective Date: circa 1626 being or suggestive of an insect
Insectile
Insectile \In*sec"tile\, a. Pertaining to, or having the nature of, insects. --Bacon.
Insectile
(a.) Pertaining to, or having the nature of, insects.
Insection
Insection \In*sec"tion\, n. [See {Insect}.] A cutting in; incisure; incision. [1913 Webster]
Insection
Insection \In*sec"tion\, n. [See {Insect}.] A cutting in; incisure; incision.
Insection
(n.) A cutting in; incisure; incision.
Insectivora
Insectivora \In`sec*tiv"o*ra\, n. pl. [NL., from L. insectum an insect + vorare to devour.] (Zo["o]l.) 1. An order of mammals which feed principally upon insects. [1913 Webster] Note: They are mostly of small size, and their molar teeth have sharp cusps. Most of the species burrow in the earth, and many of those of cold climates hibernate in winter. The order includes the moles, shrews, hedgehogs, tanrecs, and allied animals, also the colugo. [1913 Webster] 2. A division of the {Chiroptera}, including the common or insect-eating bats. [1913 Webster]
Insectivora
Insectivora \In`sec*tiv"o*ra\, n. pl. [NL., from L. insectum an insect + vorare to devour.] (Zo["o]l.) 1. An order of mammals which feed principally upon insects. Note: They are mostly of small size, and their molar teeth have sharp cusps. Most of the species burrow in the earth, and many of those of cold climates hibernate in winter. The order includes the moles, shrews, hedgehogs, tanrecs, and allied animals, also the colugo. 2. A division of the Cheiroptera, including the common or insect-eating bats.
Insectivora
(n. pl.) An order of mammals which feed principally upon insects.
Insectivora
Insectivora n : shrews; moles; hedgehogs; tenrecs [syn: {Insectivora}, {order Insectivora}]
Insectivora (2)
(n. pl.) A division of the Cheiroptera, including the common or insect-eating bats.
insectivore
n. 1 any mammal of the order Insectivora feeding on insects etc., e.g. a hedgehog or mole. 2 any plant which captures and absorbs insects. øøinsectivorous adj. [F f. mod.L insectivorus (as INSECT, -VORE: see -VOROUS)]
insectivore
n. 1 any mammal of the order Insectivora feeding on insects etc., e.g. a hedgehog or mole. 2 any plant which captures and absorbs insects. øøinsectivorous adj. [F f. mod.L insectivorus (as INSECT, -VORE: see -VOROUS)]
insectivore
Insektenfresser {m}
Insectivore
Insectivore \In*sec"ti*vore\, n.; pl. {Insectivores} (-v[=o]rz). [F.] (Zo["o]l.) One of the Insectivora. [1913 Webster]
insectivore
noun Etymology: New Latin Insectivora, from Latin insectum + -vorus -vorous Date: 1840 1. any of an order (Insectivora) of small usually nocturnal mammals (as moles, shrews, and hedgehogs) that feed mainly on insects 2. an insectivorous plant or animal
insectivore
n. 1 any mammal of the order Insectivora feeding on insects etc., e.g. a hedgehog or mole. 2 any plant which captures and absorbs insects. Derivatives: insectivorous adj. Etymology: F f. mod.L insectivorus (as INSECT, -VORE: see -VOROUS)
Insectivore
Insectivore \In*sec"ti*vore\, n.; pl. {Insectivores} (-v[=o]rz). [F.] (Zo["o]l.) One of the Insectivora.
Insectivore
(n.) One of the Insectivora.
insectivore
insectivore n 1: small insect-eating mainly nocturnal terrestrial or fossorial mammals 2: any organism that feeds mainly on insects
Insectivores
Insectivore \In*sec"ti*vore\, n.; pl. {Insectivores} (-v[=o]rz). [F.] (Zo["o]l.) One of the Insectivora. [1913 Webster]
Insectivores
Insectivore \In*sec"ti*vore\, n.; pl. {Insectivores} (-v[=o]rz). [F.] (Zo["o]l.) One of the Insectivora.
Insectivores
(pl. ) of Insectivore
insectivorous
ˌinsek'tivərəs
insectivorous
insektenfressend
Insectivorous
Insectivorous \In`sec*tiv"o*rous\, a. [See {Insectivora}.] Feeding or subsisting on insects; carnivorous. The term is applied: (a) to plants which have some special adaptation for catching and digesting insects, as the sundew, Venus's flytrap, Sarracenia, etc. (b) to the Insectivora, and many bats, birds, and reptiles. [1913 Webster]
insectivorous
adjective Date: 1661 feeding on insects
Insectivorous
Insectivorous \In`sec*tiv"o*rous\, a. [See {Insectivora}.] Feeding or subsisting on insects; carnivorous. The term is applied: (a) to plants which have some special adaptation for catching and digesting insects, as the sundew, Venus's flytrap, Sarracenia, etc. (b) to the Insectivora, and to many bats, birds, and reptiles.
Insectivorous
(a.) Feeding or subsisting on insects; carnivorous.
insectivorous
insectivorous adj : (of animals and plants) feeding on insects [ant: {carnivorous}, {herbivorous}, {omnivorous}]
Insectivorous (2)
(a.) plants which have some special adaptation for catching and digesting insects, as the sundew, Venus's flytrap, Sarracenia, etc.
Insectivorous (3)
(a.) the Insectivora, and to many bats, birds, and reptiles.
insectlike
insectlike adj : resembling an insect; "a hairy insectlike flower"
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